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Publications II/2020

Alber, Erdmute: "From Tightrope Walks to Entangled Families"Hide

How does being a parent in the field influence a researcher's positionality and the production of ethnographic knowledge?

Based on regionally and thematically diverse cases, this collection explores methodological, theoretical, and ethical dimensions of accompanied fieldwork. The authors show how multiple familial relations and the presence of their children, partners, or other family members impact the immersion into the field and the construction of its boundaries.

Female and male authors from various career stages exemplify different research conditions, financial constraints, and family-career challenges which are decisive for academic success.

Alber 2020: From Tightrope Walks to Entangled Families. In: Fabienne Braukmann, Michaela Haug, Katja Metzmacher, Rosalie Stolz (Hg.): Being a Parent in the Field: Implications and Challenges of Accompanied Fieldwork. Transcript: Bielefeld: 279-286.

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Arndt, Susan: "Blinded by Privilege. The West and the Rest under Lockdown"Hide

The coronavirus pandemic has rapidly changed our world. In response to this challenge, we are publishing the pamphlet 13 Perspectives On The Pandemic: Thinking In A State Of Exception. This free publication provides a virtual space for thinkers in the humanities to historically embed and critically interrogate our response to the Covid-19 crisis. We hope it will become a useful part of the academic response to reflect the current moment.

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Bunza, Mukhtar Umar: "Islamic/Muslim Education in Africa: From North to West Africa"Hide

This handbook explores the evolution of African education in historical perspectives as well as the development within its three systems–Indigenous, Islamic, and Western education models—and how African societies have maintained and changed their approaches to education within and across these systems. African education continues to find itself at once preserving its knowledge, while integrating Islamic and Western aspects in order to compete within this global reality. Contributors take up issues and themes of the positioning, resistance, accommodation, and transformations of indigenous education in relationship to the introduction of Islamic and later Western education. Issues and themes raised acknowledge the contemporary development and positioning of indigenous education within African societies and provide understanding of how indigenous education works within individual societies and national frameworks as an essential part of African contemporary society.

       Abidogun, J.M., Falola, T., 2020. The Palgrave handbook of African education and indigenous knowledge. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

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De Groof, Matthias: "Lumumba in the Arts"Hide

Lumumba as a symbol of decolonisation and as an icon in the arts

It is no coincidence that a historical figure such as Patrice Emery Lumumba, independent Congo’s first prime minister, who was killed in 1961, has lived in the realm of the cultural imaginary and occupied an afterlife in the arts. After all, his project remained unfinished and his corpse unburied. The figure of Lumumba has been imagined through painting, photography, cinema, poetry, literature, theatre, music, sculpture, fashion, cartoons and stamps, and also through historiography and in public space. No art form has been able to escape and remain indifferent to Lumumba. Artists observe the memory and the unresolved suffering that inscribed itself both upon Lumumba’s body and within the history of Congo. If Lumumba – as an icon – lives on today, it is because the need for decolonisation does as well.

Rather than seeking to unravel the truth of actual events surrounding the historical Lumumba, this book engages with his representations. What is more, it considers every historiography as inherently embedded in iconography. Film scholars, art critics, historians, philosophers, and anthropologists discuss the rich iconographic heritage inspired by Lumumba. Furthermore, Lumumba in the Arts offers unique testimonies by a number of artists who have contributed to Lumumba's polymorphic iconography, such as Marlene Dumas, Luc Tuymans, Raoul Peck, and Tshibumba Kanda Matulu, and includes contributions by such highly acclaimed scholars as Johannes Fabian, Bogumil Jewsiewicky, and Elikia M’Bokolo.

ISBN 9789462701748, paperback, 19,5 x 28,5 cm, 464 p., English

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Fendler, Ute: "Ghosts as Mediators: Memory, Healing, Knowing and the Negation of Time"Hide

Hauntology, as as theoretical perspective, opens a field to discuss presence and absence, visibility and invisibility also beyond Literary, Religious or Visual Studies. It relates the lingering of presumably ‘failed’ ideas to the concept of ‘ghosts’ and specters as the haunting presence of past or simultaneously present futures. The scholars and artists contributing to this volume dis-cussed these conceptual outlines in a series of transdisciplinary events, hosted by the editors. The concept proved particularly fruitful in the context of the discourse on global migration, European border politics and the re-emergences of nationalism and right-wing and straight men politics.

Hauntology in this context enables to see that the so-called crises lie somewhere very different: Not in the movement of people but in the di-spensation of wealth and access throughout the world. The present we live is embedded in the presence of ghosts and specters, and the traces of imag-inations of different times and spaces may become visible and doable. Art in its various forms is the integral part of the hauntological discussion. As such, the contributions by Kitso Lynn Lelliott (Johannesburg), Simon Vincent (London), Silhouette Tapes (Bayreuth/Berlin), Danilo Barata (Cachoeira), Spoek Mathambo (Johannesburg), Henriette Gunkel (London), Esther Peeren (Amsterdam), Renzo Baas (London), Ute Fendler (Bayreuth), Kathrin Rothe-mund (Bayreuth), Jörg Skiebeleit (Berlin/Flossenbürg), Ibrahim Mahamat Zene (Bayreuth/ N’Djamena) and others sound the field of hauntology for the future. Stipulating hauntological thinking may help to see, feel and listen to worlds radically different from the “capitalist realism” (Fisher) of the con-temporary.


In: Fink, Katharina ; Kohl, Marie-Anne ; Siegert, Nadine (ed.): Ghosts, specters, revenants : Hauntology as a means to think and feel future. - Bayreuth : iwalewabooks , 2020 . - (Diskurs ; 2 ) ISBN 978-3-947902-12-5

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Fink, K., Kohl, M.-A., Siegert, N.: "Ghosts, specters, revenants Hauntology as a means to think and feel future"Hide

Fink, Katharina; Kohl, Marie-Anne; Nadine Siegert, Nadine: "Ghosts, specters, revenants Hauntology as a means to think and feel future.

Hauntology, as as theoretical perspective, opens a field to discuss presence and absence, visibility and invisibility also beyond Literary, Religious or Visual Studies. It relates the lingering of presumably ‘failed’ ideas to the concept of ‘ghosts’ and specters as the haunting presence of past or simultaneously present futures. The scholars and artists contributing to this volume dis-cussed these conceptual outlines in a series of transdisciplinary events, hosted by the editors. The concept proved particularly fruitful in the context of the discourse on global migration, European border politics and the re-emergences of nationalism and right-wing and straight men politics.

Hauntology in this context enables to see that the so-called crises lie somewhere very different: Not in the movement of people but in the di-spensation of wealth and access throughout the world. The present we live is embedded in the presence of ghosts and specters, and the traces of imag-inations of different times and spaces may become visible and doable. Art in its various forms is the integral part of the hauntological discussion. As such, the contributions by Kitso Lynn Lelliott (Johannesburg), Simon Vincent (London), Silhouette Tapes (Bayreuth/Berlin), Danilo Barata (Cachoeira), Spoek Mathambo (Johannesburg), Henriette Gunkel (London), Esther Peeren (Amsterdam), Renzo Baas (London), Ute Fendler (Bayreuth), Kathrin Rothe-mund (Bayreuth), Jörg Skiebeleit (Berlin/Flossenbürg), Ibrahim Mahamat Zene (Bayreuth/ N’Djamena) and others sound the field of hauntology for the future. Stipulating hauntological thinking may help to see, feel and listen to worlds radically different from the “capitalist realism” (Fisher) of the con-temporary.

Fink, Katharina; Kohl, Marie-Anne; Nadine Siegert, Nadine, 2020. Ghosts, specters, revenants Hauntology as a means to think and feel future.

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Haas, R.; Kohl, M.-A; Ndogo, S.; Odhiambo, C.J: “Power to the People?”Hide

Matatu is a peer-reviewed journal on African literatures and societies dedicated to interdisciplinary dialogue between literary and cultural studies, historiography, the social sciences and cultural anthropology.
Matatu is animated by a lively interest in African culture and literature (including the Afro-Caribbean) that moves beyond worn-out clichés of “cultural authenticity” and “national liberation” towards critical exploration of African modernities. The East African public transport vehicle from which Matatu takes its name is both a component and a symbol of these modernities: based on “Western” (these days usually "Asian") technology, it is a vigorously African institution; it is usually regarded with some anxiety by those travelling in it, but is often enough the only means of transport available; it creates temporary communicative communities and provides a transient site for the exchange of news, storytelling, and political debate.

In Matatut, Band 51 (2020): Ausgabe 1 (Jun 2020): Special Issue: “Power to the People?”—Patronage, Intervention and Transformation in African Performative Arts

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Lingelbach, Jochen: "On the Edges of Whiteness"Hide

Lingelbach, Jochen: "On the edges of whiteness: Polish refugees in British colonial Africa during and after the Second World War"

“From 1942 to 1950, nearly twenty thousand Poles found refuge from the horrors of war-torn Europe in camps within Britain’s African colonies, including Uganda, Tanganyika, Kenya and Northern and Southern Rhodesia. On the Edges of Whiteness tells their improbable story, tracing the manifold, complex relationships that developed among refugees, their British administrators, and their African neighbors. While intervening in key historical debates across academic disciplines, this book also gives an accessible and memorable account of survival and dramatic cultural dislocation against the backdrop of global conflict.”

     Lingelbach, J., 2020. On the edges of whiteness: Polish refugees in British colonial Africa during and after the Second World War. Berghahn Books, New York.

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Mohr, Susanne: "Language choices among South African migrants in the tourist space of Zanzibar"Hide

In an increasingly mobile world, in which people and languages from different cultures meet all across the globe, the development and dynamics of linguistically and culturally superdiverse spaces are of particular sociolinguistic interest. In this regard, two important phenomena are migration and tourism. This article analyses language choices and their motivations in the superdiverse tourist space of Zanzibar. Applying Q-methodology developed for behavioural psychology, the article presents a case study of two South African migrant workers and two local Zanzibari hosts, and motivations for their languages choices in interaction with tourists. The results show important differences between the South Africans who choose their native language English for practical reasons and the Zanzibaris who accommodate tourists to a much larger extent and use a large linguistic repertoire to boast. Apart from English, ‘Hakuna Matata Swahili’ (HMS), a simplified form of Kiswahili, is frequently used. The South Africans employ it possibly due to their lack of Kiswahili skills and the popularity of HMS expressions in popular culture. In this way, language choices and reasons for them illustrate the glocal nature of language practices in tourism and the liminal status of the South Africans in Zanzibari society.

Mohr, S., 2020. Language choices among South African migrants in the tourist space of Zanzibar. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 38, 60–72. https://doi.org/10.2989/16073614.2020.1750966

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Mohr, Susanne: "The "I" in sociolinguistics: The role of subjectivity in ethnographic fieldwork"Hide

This paper illustrates the importance of reflexivity for the awareness of a researcher’s subjectivity in (socio)linguistic work on tourism, particularly during fieldwork. It shows that a researcher’s positionality, i.e. their loyalties to epistemological conceptions and tools, crucially affects every part of the research process, reaching from the inception of the topic, to the choice of the relevant methodology and participants, to such apparently objective procedures as statistical analyses. This is illustrated by a study applying Q-methodology from psychology used to investigate language choices in the tourist space of Zanzibar. The method’s focus on subjective views of the participants makes it a powerful tool to raise a researcher’s awareness of their own subjectivity with respect to the research process. Ultimately, the paper argues, such constructionist approaches to science produce more valid results in linguistics, as well as in other areas of science in general.

Mohr, Susanne. (2020). The "I" in sociolinguistics: The role of subjectivity in ethnographic fieldwork. 101-118.

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Nene, Morisho; Kalubi, Josepha; Park, Sung-Joon; Doevenspeck, Martin: "Same but Different? A Comparison of Ebola ...Hide

Nene, Morisho; Kalubi, Josepha; Park, Sung-Joon; Doevenspeck, Martin: "Same but Different? A Comparison of Ebola Virus Disease and Covid-19 After the Ebola Epidemic in Eastern DRC (2018–20)"

In February 2020, we were still following the case numbers of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemic in North Kivu, Eastern Congo, which by then were finally coming down. At the same time, we were also following the news of the Covid-19 pandemic which had spread within China and thereafter in Europe and in the US. By then, most African governments, just as those in Europe or the US weeks before, were still seeing it as a distant problem and no measures had been taken in preparation.

On March 3, the last patient with the Ebola was discharged in North Kivu Province, the epidemic having lasted more than two years. On March 10, the first case of Covid-19 was confirmed in Kinshasa. It took two weeks for the authorities to take a firm decision to lock down the city, prohibit mobility between the capital and other provinces, and ban access to Congolese territory for any international flight. Panic set in for most Congolese citizens who felt they had never experienced such a global crisis before.

Moving from one crisis to the next raises the question: what can be learned from the Ebola epidemic for the Covid-19 pandemic? Are inhabitants of the most affected regions better prepared for Covid-19? Will the lessons learnt from the Ebola epidemic help citizens in the entire country to adapt to the new pandemic too? What are the similarities and differences between these two epidemics or pandemic?

Nene, Morisho; Kalubi, Josepha; Park, Sung-Joon; Doevenspeck, Martin: "Same but Different? A Comparison of Ebola Virus Disease and Covid-19 After the Ebola Epidemic in Eastern DRC (2018–20)". In: African Arguments

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Ouma, Stefan: "Farming as Financial Asset: Global Finance and the Making of Institutional Landscapes"Hide

Ouma, Stefan: "Farming as Financial Asset: Global Finance and the Making of Institutional Landscapes"

Since the global financial crisis, the world has seen a stark rise in financial investment in farming and agricultural production. Indeed, finance has been identified as one of the main causes of the so-called “global land rush”. In a world with a growing population that needs to be fed, the financial returns from agriculture are sold as safe bets. The debate that this has prompted has been frequently alarmist, with financiers blamed for rising land prices, corporate enclosures, the dispossession of smallholder farmers and the expansion of large-scale industrial agriculture.

Stefan Ouma speaks to these concerns via an ethnographic journey through the agrifocused asset management industry. His penetrating analysis of case studies taken from New Zealand and Tanzania allows him to put global finance “in place”, bringing into view the flesh-and-blood institutions, globespanning social relations, everyday practices and place-based value struggles that are often absent in broad-brushed narratives on the “financialization of agriculture”. The book closes with a key question for the Anthropocene: which form of finance for which kind of food future?

OUMA, S., 2020. FARMING AS FINANCIAL ASSET. AGENDA PUBLISHING, S.l.


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Owino, Omondi R.: "Embracing A Culture of Environmental Compliance Auditing"Hide

Environmental abuses in Kenya ‘triple satanic depravity’. Nothing brings this assertion to the fore more than the recent Nation Newspaper’s investigative pieces on environmental abuses in the Lake Victoria aptly intituled ‘Lake of Poison’. The diabolical nature of environmental abuses in Kenya rings true when one thinks back to the Owino Uhuru slum lead poisoning case which has led to the loss of several lives and continues to threaten the existence of an entire village. Memories of Solai dam disaster which left 48 people dead in its wake and a trail of destruction of apocalyptic proportions in May 2018 remain fresh. The insidious threat to life and limb on dining tables in Kenyan homes came to the fore when NTV in late 2019 ran an exposé titled the ‘Toxic Flow’ on pollution of Nairobi River. The documentary detailed how toxins pumped into Nairobi River by industries find their way into food and water consumed by Kenyans.

Omondi R. Owino ‘Embracing A Culture of Environmental Compliance Auditing’ Justice Newsletter, Vol 3 Issue 1 2020:37-38

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Owino, Omondi R.:"Realizing a Low Carbon Future in the East African Community Energy Sector"Hide

Owino, Omondi R.:"Realizing a Low Carbon Future in the East African Community Energy Sector: Assessment of the Regional Policy and Legislative Framework"

The twin concerns of regulating climate change and spurring economic development lie at the intersection of a low carbon development pathway. Legislative measures aimed at curbing climate change are often construed as dampeners on economic development with the assumption that such laws pose a competitive disadvantage for national economies and companies. This article however advances the contrarian argument that, with the ascendancy of renewable energy technologies, it is increasingly becoming clear that ‘laws to tackle climate change are leading to greater resource and energy efficiency, clean, low carbon growth and improved energy safety. This promise then becomes the premise that is tested along the contours of the EAC regulatory landscape and against the background of regional initiatives in as far as realization of a low-carbon development pathway is concerned. The article makes the conclusion that the varied regional initiatives, policies and legislative measures in the EAC, that ought to advance the realization of a low-carbon pathway are inchoate and beset by several dampeners. The foregoing fact notwithstanding, several drivers of a low-carbon pathway are identifiable. Both the regional and national renewable energy
and efficiency measures adopted in the EAC set the stage for a low-carbon development pathway. Upon attaining maturity, it is a valid presupposition that these budding measures can address climate change without necessarily curtailing economic development.

Omondi R. Owino ‘Realizing a Low Carbon Future in the East African Community Energy Sector: Assessment of the Regional Policy and Legislative Framework’ The African Review, Vol. 45, No. 2 (Special Issue) December, 2018:154-170

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Sabbi, Matthew; Doumbia, Lamine; Neubert, Dieter: "Dynamics of Everyday Life within Municipal Administrations ...Hide

Sabbi, Matthew; Doumbia, Lamine; Neubert, Dieter: "Dynamics of Everyday Life within Municipal Administrations in Francophone and Anglophone Africa"

Decentralisation in sub-Saharan Africa promises to build responsive institutions, hold officials to account and promote popular participation. Still, existent studies ignore the everyday interface between decentralised structures and citizens, as well as how decentralised institutions function in relation to their local contexts and other “authorities” on the margins. These contexts shape service provision and the impact of local power structures on local communities. Against this backdrop, our conference in Dakar, Senegal, on “Dynamics of Everyday Life within Municipal Administrations in Francophone and Anglophone Africa,” which took place in May 2019, demonstrated three key points of interest: namely, how actors within local bureaucracies interface with those who are outside; how ordinary citizens appropriate the bureaucratic techniques of the state and how these actors negotiate and adapt to the daily practices of municipal administrations. In general, decentralisation is not simply implemented, rather, it creates new frameworks and spaces for both formal and informal public action.

Sabbi, M., Doumbia, L., Neubert, D., 2020. Dynamics of Everyday Life within Municipal Administrations in Francophone and Anglophone Africa. Africa Spectrum 000203972091463. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002039720914630

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Tchokothe, R: "(au)tour de Mayotte. "Mayotte à la dérive" en dialogue avec quelques œuvres littéraires"Hide

Rémi Tchokothe est maître de conférence en Littératures Africaines et en Études des langues africaines à l‘Université de Bayreuth, Principal Investigator dans le Cluster of Excellence “Africa Multiple: Reconfiguring African Studies” et professeur associé au Centre Universitaire de Formation et de Recherche de Mayotte. Il est l’auteur de Transgression in Swahili Narrative Fiction and Its Reception (2014), co-éditeur du volume sur Les Littératures Francophones de l’Archipel des Comores (2017) et coordinateur du volume Qui a peur de la Littérature Wolof ? (2018) sur l‘oeuvre Wolophone de Boubacar Boris Diop. Il travaille actuellement sur la question de la ‚migration‘ vers Mayotte

Tchokothe, R. 2020. (au)tour de Mayotte. apropos [Perspektiven auf die Romania]. 4 (Juni 2020), 111-119. DOI:https://doi.org/10.15460/apropos.4.1527.

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Tchokothe, R: "Le petit Mahorais apprend à écrire de droite à gauche à l´école coranique. Ensuite de gauche à droite avec ...Hide

Tchokothe, R: "Le petit Mahorais apprend à écrire de droite à gauche à l´école coranique. Ensuite de gauche à droite avec l´alphabet Latin"

Auteur-Acteur-Compositeur-Dramaturge-Fondateur de maison de culture-Ancien Dj de bals poussière, Nassur Attoumani, le porteur de multiples casquettes fidèle à son casque colonial est l’une des voix artistiques les plus importantes de l’archipel des Comores. Dans cet entretien Nassur Attoumani parle des langues d’écriture et des identités littéraires, des réseaux littéraires, de l’écrivain « postcolonial » comme traducteur (in)conscient, du lectorat absent, de la crise humanitaire liée à la « migration » des îles d’Anjouan, de Mohéli et de la Grande-Comore vers Mayotte et du mythe du casque colonial qu’il porte fièrement depuis plusieurs décennies.

chokothe, Rémi„« Le petit Mahorais apprend à é crire de droite à gauche à l’école coranique. Ensuite de gauche à droite avec l’alphabet Latin ». Entretien avec l’écrivain mahorais Nassur Attoumani“, apropos [Perspektiven auf die Romania]4, 132-140. doi:10.15460/apropos.4.1528

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Vierke, Clarissa: "Poetry"Hide

This chapter offers an overview of poetry in African languages from all over the continent, which is, on the one hand, the most universal and the most specific literary form. Most African cultures did not have a specific term for literature before colonialism, but have long traditions of rhythmically bound speech reserved for special occasions and used to promote the most important ideals and aspirations of society which have proved flexible to newly emerging styles. Given the beauty, vitality, and long history of poetry and its diversity rooted in its intimate connection with respective cultural contexts, concepts of aesthetics, and language form, the chapter starts by making heuristic use of generic categories, like epic and praise poetry, to be able to both draw comparisons and highlight cultural specifics. It pays attention to poetry’s changing media across time while also going beyond the typical dichotomy of “traditional” and “modern” poetry.

2020. Vierke, Clarissa. Poetry. In Rainer Vossen and Gerrit Dimmendaal (eds): The Oxford Handbook of African Languages. Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199609895.013.5

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