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Cluster of Excellence EXC 2052 - "Africa Multiple: reconfiguring African Studies"

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Recent Publications

The list below comprises publications from our Cluster members and partners.

The Africa Multiple Cluster also publishes a Working Paper series, Africa Multiple Connects:

Seesemann, Rüdiger: "Figuring out how to Reconfigure African Studies."Hide

As the Working Paper Series of the Africa Multiple Cluster of Excellence, Africa Multiple connects offers a forum for research conducted and presented by researchers affiliated to the Cluster. The series also accommodates papers such as invited lectures, workshop contributions, or conference papers submitted by the Cluster’s guests and visiting scholars.

Established in January 2019 through the Excellence Strategy of the German Federal and State Governments, and building on a long record in African Studies at the University of Bayreuth, the Africa Multiple Cluster of Excellence pursues an innovative agenda as expressed in its subtitle, Reconfiguring African Studies. The Cluster hosts almost one hundred fifty scholars from three continents, who represent a diverse range of academic disciplines and pursue joint research interests together with partner institutions in Africa, Germany, Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Our understanding of the reconfiguration of African Studies focuses on stimulating new theore­tical approaches and includes the creation of new forms of academic collaboration. The Cluster develops and pursues research questions and theory-building in collaborative interdisciplinary projects, most notably those conducted with our African Cluster Centres (ACCs) at the Universi­ties of Lagos (Nigeria), Joseph Ki-Zerbo (Burkina Faso), Moi (Kenya), and Rhodes (South Africa).

Our key concepts are multiplicity, relationality, and reflexivity. We employ them to capture the dynamic interrelationship of diversity and entanglement that characterize African and African diasporic ways of life and world-making.

Africa Multiple connects complements the existing Working Paper sub-series published under the umbrella of the University of Bayreuth African Studies Working Papers: academy reflects, the sub-series featuring research by fellows and postdoc working groups of the Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies, which is now part of the Africa Multiple Cluster; and BIGSASworks!, the platform for publishing research-related articles and edited volumes by Junior Fellows of the Bayreuth International Graduate School of African Studies (BIGSAS).


Institute of African Studies, Bayreuth, Germany : Institute of African Studies , 2020 . - V, 15 S. - (University of Bayreuth African Studies Working Papers ; 24 ) (Africa Multiple Connects; 1), DOI: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005120

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The Cluster encourages publications with our international partners. Please see an open list of journals and series here.

For more information please contact  africamultiple-international@uni-bayreuth.de

2020 - IV

Seesemann, Rüdiger: "Figuring out how to Reconfigure African Studies."Hide

As the Working Paper Series of the Africa Multiple Cluster of Excellence, Africa Multiple connects offers a forum for research conducted and presented by researchers affiliated to the Cluster. The series also accommodates papers such as invited lectures, workshop contributions, or conference papers submitted by the Cluster’s guests and visiting scholars.

Established in January 2019 through the Excellence Strategy of the German Federal and State Governments, and building on a long record in African Studies at the University of Bayreuth, the Africa Multiple Cluster of Excellence pursues an innovative agenda as expressed in its subtitle, Reconfiguring African Studies. The Cluster hosts almost one hundred fifty scholars from three continents, who represent a diverse range of academic disciplines and pursue joint research interests together with partner institutions in Africa, Germany, Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Our understanding of the reconfiguration of African Studies focuses on stimulating new theore­tical approaches and includes the creation of new forms of academic collaboration. The Cluster develops and pursues research questions and theory-building in collaborative interdisciplinary projects, most notably those conducted with our African Cluster Centres (ACCs) at the Universi­ties of Lagos (Nigeria), Joseph Ki-Zerbo (Burkina Faso), Moi (Kenya), and Rhodes (South Africa).

Our key concepts are multiplicity, relationality, and reflexivity. We employ them to capture the dynamic interrelationship of diversity and entanglement that characterize African and African diasporic ways of life and world-making.

Africa Multiple connects complements the existing Working Paper sub-series published under the umbrella of the University of Bayreuth African Studies Working Papers: academy reflects, the sub-series featuring research by fellows and postdoc working groups of the Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies, which is now part of the Africa Multiple Cluster; and BIGSASworks!, the platform for publishing research-related articles and edited volumes by Junior Fellows of the Bayreuth International Graduate School of African Studies (BIGSAS).


Institute of African Studies, Bayreuth, Germany : Institute of African Studies , 2020 . - V, 15 S. - (University of Bayreuth African Studies Working Papers ; 24 ) (Africa Multiple Connects; 1), DOI: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005120

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2020 - III


Arndt, Susan: "Sexismus. Geschichte einer Unterdrückung" Hide

Zwar ist Sexismus spätestens seit #Aufschrei und #MeToo wieder in aller Munde. Doch meist wird bloß hitzig aneinander vorbei diskutiert. Susan Arndt legt mit ihrem umfassenden Buch die Grundlage für eine fundierte und kritische Debatte jenseits von Verharmlosung und Ziellosigkeit.
Nicht wenige übersehen alltäglichen Sexismus oder leugnen ihn; andere wiederum gelten als zu moralisch oder politisch hyperaktiv. Und viele ziehen es inzwischen vor, sich gar nicht mehr zu äußern. Es gibt aber keine neutrale Position gegenüber Sexismus. Denn Sexismus ist ein umfassendes Denk- und Herrschaftssystem, das sich in die DNA unserer Gesellschaft eingeschrieben hat. Susan Arndt identifiziert als seinen Kern das Postulat der binären Zweigeschlechtlichkeit. Es erm öglicht patriarchalische Herrschaft und legt die Grundlagen für die Diskriminierung von Frauen* sowie von homosexuellen, inter*sexuellen und trans*geschlechtlichen Personen. Doch auch Männer* werden vom Sexismus als Individuen normiert und können gebrochen werden. Das Buch zeigt die systemischen Zusammenhänge von Sexismus als Herrschafts- und Machtsystem auf, beschreibt seine Geschichte(n) sowie auch, wie er sich heute äußert. Denn nur, wenn verstanden wird, was Sexismus eigentlich ist, kann er erkannt, verlernt und strukturell nachhaltig unterwandert werden - und koste es auch, Gewohntes oder gar Privilegien, Macht und Herrschaft aufzugeben.

Arndt, S., Verlag C.H. Beck, 2020. Sexismus Geschichte einer Unterdrückung.

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Echtler, Magnus: "Redeeming Zululand: Emplacing cultural resonances in the Nazareth Baptist Church, South Africa"Hide

This volume, bringing together work by scholars from Europe, East Asia, North America, and West Africa, investigates transnational religious spaces in a comparative manner by juxtaposing East Asian and African examples. It highlights flows of ideas, actors, and organizations out of, into, or within a given continental space. These flows are patterned mainly by colonialism or migration. The book also examines cases where the transnational space in question encompasses both East Asia and Africa, notably in the development of Japanese new religions in Africa. Most of the studies are located in the present; a few go back to the late nineteenth century. The volume is rounded off by Thomas Tweed’s systematic reflections on categories for the study of transnationalism; his chapter "Flows and Dams" critically weighs the metaphorical language we use to think, speak, and write about transnational religious spaces.

2020, Redeeming Zululand: Emplacing cultural resonances in the Nazareth Baptist Church, South Africa, in Transnational Religious Spaces: Religious Interactions in Africa, East Asia, and Beyond, edited by Philip Clart and Adam Jones. Oldenbourg: de Gruyter (Dialectics of the Global), 84–106.

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Frempong, Raymond; Stadelmann, David; Wild, Frederik: "Coronavirus-Lockdowns, Secondary Effects and Sustainable ..."Hide

Frempong, Raymond; Stadelmann, David; Wild, Frederik: "Coronavirus-Lockdowns, Secondary Effects and Sustainable Exit-Strategies for Sub-Saharan Africa"

Pandemics and the reactions to pandemics increase the general problem of scarcity. Scarcity induced trade-offs are
particularly relevant for countries in Sub-Saharan Africa as (1) the region suffers more than other regions from
diseases whose death toll may increase substantially due to lockdowns, (2) economic effects of lockdowns affect the
region more negatively because citizens in Sub-Saharan Africa have limited economic resources compared to more
developed economies, and (3) weak institutions may increase the adverse societal impacts of the pandemic.

Raymond Boadi Frempong & David Stadelmann & Frederik Wild, 2020. "Coronavirus-Lockdowns, Secondary Effects and Sustainable Exit-Strategies for Sub-Saharan Africa," CREMA Working Paper Series 2020-09, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).

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Ouma, Stefan: "Farming as Financial Asset: Global Finance and the Making of Institutional Landscapes"Hide

Since the global financial crisis, the world has seen a stark rise in financial investment in farming and agricultural production. Indeed, finance has been identified as one of the main causes of the so-called "global land rush". Agriculture and land represent safe investment opportunities and in a world with a growing population that needs to be fed, the returns are a safe bet. The debate that this has caused in the media is frequently alarmist and financiers are blamed for rising land prices and intensification of land commodification across the globe.0Stefan Ouma seeks to debunk the misconceptions and assumptions about "finance-gone-farming" with a penetrating analysis of case studies taken from both the developed and developing world, revealing the role of global finance in the agricultural sectors of these very different settings. The book provides a fascinating insight into the inner workings of the agri-focused asset management industry.

Ouma, S., 2020. Farming as financial asset: global finance and the making of institutional landscapes. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Agenda Publishing, 2020. ISBN: 978-1-78821-187-1

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Spies, E., Schrode, P.: "Religious engineering: exploring projects of transformation from a relational perspective"Hide
This introduction presents the concept of religious engineering, offering a new perspective on a field of research which deals with the interrelations of religion and international development. The concept, we propose, allows for an analysis of a wide array of projects of transformation without presupposing religion, secularity and development as different given spheres or concepts. Following criticisms of the instrumental use of a sui generis concept of religion and a narrow definition of development, we suggest a focus on the relational, on-going constitution of development and religion through transformative practices of religious engineering. This refers to ways of working on the future shape of a society, group or individual, where the ‘engineers’ allude to what they understand as religious traditions and practices. At the same time, the concept accesses purposeful transformations of religious traditions and self-understandings that are spurred on by such projects of societal and/or individual improvement.

Spies, E., Schrode, P., 2020. Religious engineering: exploring projects of transformation from a relational perspective. Religion 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1080/0048721X.2020.1792053

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2020 - II


Alber, Erdmute: "From Tightrope Walks to Entangled Families"Hide

How does being a parent in the field influence a researcher's positionality and the production of ethnographic knowledge?

Based on regionally and thematically diverse cases, this collection explores methodological, theoretical, and ethical dimensions of accompanied fieldwork. The authors show how multiple familial relations and the presence of their children, partners, or other family members impact the immersion into the field and the construction of its boundaries.

Female and male authors from various career stages exemplify different research conditions, financial constraints, and family-career challenges which are decisive for academic success.

Alber 2020: From Tightrope Walks to Entangled Families. In: Fabienne Braukmann, Michaela Haug, Katja Metzmacher, Rosalie Stolz (Hg.): Being a Parent in the Field: Implications and Challenges of Accompanied Fieldwork. Transcript: Bielefeld: 279-286.

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Arndt, Susan: "Blinded by Privilege. The West and the Rest under Lockdown"Hide

The coronavirus pandemic has rapidly changed our world. In response to this challenge, we are publishing the pamphlet 13 Perspectives On The Pandemic: Thinking In A State Of Exception. This free publication provides a virtual space for thinkers in the humanities to historically embed and critically interrogate our response to the Covid-19 crisis. We hope it will become a useful part of the academic response to reflect the current moment.

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Bunza, Mukhtar Umar: "Islamic/Muslim Education in Africa: From North to West Africa"Hide

This handbook explores the evolution of African education in historical perspectives as well as the development within its three systems–Indigenous, Islamic, and Western education models—and how African societies have maintained and changed their approaches to education within and across these systems. African education continues to find itself at once preserving its knowledge, while integrating Islamic and Western aspects in order to compete within this global reality. Contributors take up issues and themes of the positioning, resistance, accommodation, and transformations of indigenous education in relationship to the introduction of Islamic and later Western education. Issues and themes raised acknowledge the contemporary development and positioning of indigenous education within African societies and provide understanding of how indigenous education works within individual societies and national frameworks as an essential part of African contemporary society.

       Abidogun, J.M., Falola, T., 2020. The Palgrave handbook of African education and indigenous knowledge. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

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De Groof, Matthias: "Lumumba in the Arts"Hide

Lumumba as a symbol of decolonisation and as an icon in the arts

It is no coincidence that a historical figure such as Patrice Emery Lumumba, independent Congo’s first prime minister, who was killed in 1961, has lived in the realm of the cultural imaginary and occupied an afterlife in the arts. After all, his project remained unfinished and his corpse unburied. The figure of Lumumba has been imagined through painting, photography, cinema, poetry, literature, theatre, music, sculpture, fashion, cartoons and stamps, and also through historiography and in public space. No art form has been able to escape and remain indifferent to Lumumba. Artists observe the memory and the unresolved suffering that inscribed itself both upon Lumumba’s body and within the history of Congo. If Lumumba – as an icon – lives on today, it is because the need for decolonisation does as well.

Rather than seeking to unravel the truth of actual events surrounding the historical Lumumba, this book engages with his representations. What is more, it considers every historiography as inherently embedded in iconography. Film scholars, art critics, historians, philosophers, and anthropologists discuss the rich iconographic heritage inspired by Lumumba. Furthermore, Lumumba in the Arts offers unique testimonies by a number of artists who have contributed to Lumumba's polymorphic iconography, such as Marlene Dumas, Luc Tuymans, Raoul Peck, and Tshibumba Kanda Matulu, and includes contributions by such highly acclaimed scholars as Johannes Fabian, Bogumil Jewsiewicky, and Elikia M’Bokolo.

ISBN 9789462701748, paperback, 19,5 x 28,5 cm, 464 p., English

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Fendler, Ute: "Ghosts as Mediators: Memory, Healing, Knowing and the Negation of Time"Hide

Hauntology, as as theoretical perspective, opens a field to discuss presence and absence, visibility and invisibility also beyond Literary, Religious or Visual Studies. It relates the lingering of presumably ‘failed’ ideas to the concept of ‘ghosts’ and specters as the haunting presence of past or simultaneously present futures. The scholars and artists contributing to this volume dis-cussed these conceptual outlines in a series of transdisciplinary events, hosted by the editors. The concept proved particularly fruitful in the context of the discourse on global migration, European border politics and the re-emergences of nationalism and right-wing and straight men politics.

Hauntology in this context enables to see that the so-called crises lie somewhere very different: Not in the movement of people but in the di-spensation of wealth and access throughout the world. The present we live is embedded in the presence of ghosts and specters, and the traces of imag-inations of different times and spaces may become visible and doable. Art in its various forms is the integral part of the hauntological discussion. As such, the contributions by Kitso Lynn Lelliott (Johannesburg), Simon Vincent (London), Silhouette Tapes (Bayreuth/Berlin), Danilo Barata (Cachoeira), Spoek Mathambo (Johannesburg), Henriette Gunkel (London), Esther Peeren (Amsterdam), Renzo Baas (London), Ute Fendler (Bayreuth), Kathrin Rothe-mund (Bayreuth), Jörg Skiebeleit (Berlin/Flossenbürg), Ibrahim Mahamat Zene (Bayreuth/ N’Djamena) and others sound the field of hauntology for the future. Stipulating hauntological thinking may help to see, feel and listen to worlds radically different from the “capitalist realism” (Fisher) of the con-temporary.


In: Fink, Katharina ; Kohl, Marie-Anne ; Siegert, Nadine (ed.): Ghosts, specters, revenants : Hauntology as a means to think and feel future. - Bayreuth : iwalewabooks , 2020 . - (Diskurs ; 2 ) ISBN 978-3-947902-12-5

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Fink, K., Kohl, M.-A., Siegert, N.: "Ghosts, specters, revenants Hauntology as a means to think and feel future"Hide

Fink, Katharina; Kohl, Marie-Anne; Nadine Siegert, Nadine: "Ghosts, specters, revenants Hauntology as a means to think and feel future.

Hauntology, as as theoretical perspective, opens a field to discuss presence and absence, visibility and invisibility also beyond Literary, Religious or Visual Studies. It relates the lingering of presumably ‘failed’ ideas to the concept of ‘ghosts’ and specters as the haunting presence of past or simultaneously present futures. The scholars and artists contributing to this volume dis-cussed these conceptual outlines in a series of transdisciplinary events, hosted by the editors. The concept proved particularly fruitful in the context of the discourse on global migration, European border politics and the re-emergences of nationalism and right-wing and straight men politics.

Hauntology in this context enables to see that the so-called crises lie somewhere very different: Not in the movement of people but in the di-spensation of wealth and access throughout the world. The present we live is embedded in the presence of ghosts and specters, and the traces of imag-inations of different times and spaces may become visible and doable. Art in its various forms is the integral part of the hauntological discussion. As such, the contributions by Kitso Lynn Lelliott (Johannesburg), Simon Vincent (London), Silhouette Tapes (Bayreuth/Berlin), Danilo Barata (Cachoeira), Spoek Mathambo (Johannesburg), Henriette Gunkel (London), Esther Peeren (Amsterdam), Renzo Baas (London), Ute Fendler (Bayreuth), Kathrin Rothe-mund (Bayreuth), Jörg Skiebeleit (Berlin/Flossenbürg), Ibrahim Mahamat Zene (Bayreuth/ N’Djamena) and others sound the field of hauntology for the future. Stipulating hauntological thinking may help to see, feel and listen to worlds radically different from the “capitalist realism” (Fisher) of the con-temporary.

Fink, Katharina; Kohl, Marie-Anne; Nadine Siegert, Nadine, 2020. Ghosts, specters, revenants Hauntology as a means to think and feel future.

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Haas, R.; Kohl, M.-A; Ndogo, S.; Odhiambo, C.J: “Power to the People?”Hide

Matatu is a peer-reviewed journal on African literatures and societies dedicated to interdisciplinary dialogue between literary and cultural studies, historiography, the social sciences and cultural anthropology.
Matatu is animated by a lively interest in African culture and literature (including the Afro-Caribbean) that moves beyond worn-out clichés of “cultural authenticity” and “national liberation” towards critical exploration of African modernities. The East African public transport vehicle from which Matatu takes its name is both a component and a symbol of these modernities: based on “Western” (these days usually "Asian") technology, it is a vigorously African institution; it is usually regarded with some anxiety by those travelling in it, but is often enough the only means of transport available; it creates temporary communicative communities and provides a transient site for the exchange of news, storytelling, and political debate.

In Matatut, Band 51 (2020): Ausgabe 1 (Jun 2020): Special Issue: “Power to the People?”—Patronage, Intervention and Transformation in African Performative Arts

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Lingelbach, Jochen: "On the Edges of Whiteness"Hide

Lingelbach, Jochen: "On the edges of whiteness: Polish refugees in British colonial Africa during and after the Second World War"

“From 1942 to 1950, nearly twenty thousand Poles found refuge from the horrors of war-torn Europe in camps within Britain’s African colonies, including Uganda, Tanganyika, Kenya and Northern and Southern Rhodesia. On the Edges of Whiteness tells their improbable story, tracing the manifold, complex relationships that developed among refugees, their British administrators, and their African neighbors. While intervening in key historical debates across academic disciplines, this book also gives an accessible and memorable account of survival and dramatic cultural dislocation against the backdrop of global conflict.”

     Lingelbach, J., 2020. On the edges of whiteness: Polish refugees in British colonial Africa during and after the Second World War. Berghahn Books, New York.

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Mohr, Susanne: "Language choices among South African migrants in the tourist space of Zanzibar"Hide

In an increasingly mobile world, in which people and languages from different cultures meet all across the globe, the development and dynamics of linguistically and culturally superdiverse spaces are of particular sociolinguistic interest. In this regard, two important phenomena are migration and tourism. This article analyses language choices and their motivations in the superdiverse tourist space of Zanzibar. Applying Q-methodology developed for behavioural psychology, the article presents a case study of two South African migrant workers and two local Zanzibari hosts, and motivations for their languages choices in interaction with tourists. The results show important differences between the South Africans who choose their native language English for practical reasons and the Zanzibaris who accommodate tourists to a much larger extent and use a large linguistic repertoire to boast. Apart from English, ‘Hakuna Matata Swahili’ (HMS), a simplified form of Kiswahili, is frequently used. The South Africans employ it possibly due to their lack of Kiswahili skills and the popularity of HMS expressions in popular culture. In this way, language choices and reasons for them illustrate the glocal nature of language practices in tourism and the liminal status of the South Africans in Zanzibari society.

Mohr, S., 2020. Language choices among South African migrants in the tourist space of Zanzibar. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 38, 60–72. https://doi.org/10.2989/16073614.2020.1750966

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Mohr, Susanne: "The "I" in sociolinguistics: The role of subjectivity in ethnographic fieldwork"Hide

This paper illustrates the importance of reflexivity for the awareness of a researcher’s subjectivity in (socio)linguistic work on tourism, particularly during fieldwork. It shows that a researcher’s positionality, i.e. their loyalties to epistemological conceptions and tools, crucially affects every part of the research process, reaching from the inception of the topic, to the choice of the relevant methodology and participants, to such apparently objective procedures as statistical analyses. This is illustrated by a study applying Q-methodology from psychology used to investigate language choices in the tourist space of Zanzibar. The method’s focus on subjective views of the participants makes it a powerful tool to raise a researcher’s awareness of their own subjectivity with respect to the research process. Ultimately, the paper argues, such constructionist approaches to science produce more valid results in linguistics, as well as in other areas of science in general.

Mohr, Susanne. (2020). The "I" in sociolinguistics: The role of subjectivity in ethnographic fieldwork. 101-118.

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Nene, Morisho; Kalubi, Josepha; Park, Sung-Joon; Doevenspeck, Martin: "Same but Different? A Comparison of Ebola ...Hide

Nene, Morisho; Kalubi, Josepha; Park, Sung-Joon; Doevenspeck, Martin: "Same but Different? A Comparison of Ebola Virus Disease and Covid-19 After the Ebola Epidemic in Eastern DRC (2018–20)"

In February 2020, we were still following the case numbers of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemic in North Kivu, Eastern Congo, which by then were finally coming down. At the same time, we were also following the news of the Covid-19 pandemic which had spread within China and thereafter in Europe and in the US. By then, most African governments, just as those in Europe or the US weeks before, were still seeing it as a distant problem and no measures had been taken in preparation.

On March 3, the last patient with the Ebola was discharged in North Kivu Province, the epidemic having lasted more than two years. On March 10, the first case of Covid-19 was confirmed in Kinshasa. It took two weeks for the authorities to take a firm decision to lock down the city, prohibit mobility between the capital and other provinces, and ban access to Congolese territory for any international flight. Panic set in for most Congolese citizens who felt they had never experienced such a global crisis before.

Moving from one crisis to the next raises the question: what can be learned from the Ebola epidemic for the Covid-19 pandemic? Are inhabitants of the most affected regions better prepared for Covid-19? Will the lessons learnt from the Ebola epidemic help citizens in the entire country to adapt to the new pandemic too? What are the similarities and differences between these two epidemics or pandemic?

Nene, Morisho; Kalubi, Josepha; Park, Sung-Joon; Doevenspeck, Martin: "Same but Different? A Comparison of Ebola Virus Disease and Covid-19 After the Ebola Epidemic in Eastern DRC (2018–20)". In: African Arguments

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Ouma, Stefan: "Farming as Financial Asset: Global Finance and the Making of Institutional Landscapes"Hide

Ouma, Stefan: "Farming as Financial Asset: Global Finance and the Making of Institutional Landscapes"

Since the global financial crisis, the world has seen a stark rise in financial investment in farming and agricultural production. Indeed, finance has been identified as one of the main causes of the so-called “global land rush”. In a world with a growing population that needs to be fed, the financial returns from agriculture are sold as safe bets. The debate that this has prompted has been frequently alarmist, with financiers blamed for rising land prices, corporate enclosures, the dispossession of smallholder farmers and the expansion of large-scale industrial agriculture.

Stefan Ouma speaks to these concerns via an ethnographic journey through the agrifocused asset management industry. His penetrating analysis of case studies taken from New Zealand and Tanzania allows him to put global finance “in place”, bringing into view the flesh-and-blood institutions, globespanning social relations, everyday practices and place-based value struggles that are often absent in broad-brushed narratives on the “financialization of agriculture”. The book closes with a key question for the Anthropocene: which form of finance for which kind of food future?

OUMA, S., 2020. FARMING AS FINANCIAL ASSET. AGENDA PUBLISHING, S.l.


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Owino, Omondi R.: "Embracing A Culture of Environmental Compliance Auditing"Hide

Environmental abuses in Kenya ‘triple satanic depravity’. Nothing brings this assertion to the fore more than the recent Nation Newspaper’s investigative pieces on environmental abuses in the Lake Victoria aptly intituled ‘Lake of Poison’. The diabolical nature of environmental abuses in Kenya rings true when one thinks back to the Owino Uhuru slum lead poisoning case which has led to the loss of several lives and continues to threaten the existence of an entire village. Memories of Solai dam disaster which left 48 people dead in its wake and a trail of destruction of apocalyptic proportions in May 2018 remain fresh. The insidious threat to life and limb on dining tables in Kenyan homes came to the fore when NTV in late 2019 ran an exposé titled the ‘Toxic Flow’ on pollution of Nairobi River. The documentary detailed how toxins pumped into Nairobi River by industries find their way into food and water consumed by Kenyans.

Omondi R. Owino ‘Embracing A Culture of Environmental Compliance Auditing’ Justice Newsletter, Vol 3 Issue 1 2020:37-38

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Owino, Omondi R.:"Realizing a Low Carbon Future in the East African Community Energy Sector"Hide

Owino, Omondi R.:"Realizing a Low Carbon Future in the East African Community Energy Sector: Assessment of the Regional Policy and Legislative Framework"

The twin concerns of regulating climate change and spurring economic development lie at the intersection of a low carbon development pathway. Legislative measures aimed at curbing climate change are often construed as dampeners on economic development with the assumption that such laws pose a competitive disadvantage for national economies and companies. This article however advances the contrarian argument that, with the ascendancy of renewable energy technologies, it is increasingly becoming clear that ‘laws to tackle climate change are leading to greater resource and energy efficiency, clean, low carbon growth and improved energy safety. This promise then becomes the premise that is tested along the contours of the EAC regulatory landscape and against the background of regional initiatives in as far as realization of a low-carbon development pathway is concerned. The article makes the conclusion that the varied regional initiatives, policies and legislative measures in the EAC, that ought to advance the realization of a low-carbon pathway are inchoate and beset by several dampeners. The foregoing fact notwithstanding, several drivers of a low-carbon pathway are identifiable. Both the regional and national renewable energy
and efficiency measures adopted in the EAC set the stage for a low-carbon development pathway. Upon attaining maturity, it is a valid presupposition that these budding measures can address climate change without necessarily curtailing economic development.

Omondi R. Owino ‘Realizing a Low Carbon Future in the East African Community Energy Sector: Assessment of the Regional Policy and Legislative Framework’ The African Review, Vol. 45, No. 2 (Special Issue) December, 2018:154-170

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Sabbi, Matthew; Doumbia, Lamine; Neubert, Dieter: "Dynamics of Everyday Life within Municipal Administrations ...Hide

Sabbi, Matthew; Doumbia, Lamine; Neubert, Dieter: "Dynamics of Everyday Life within Municipal Administrations in Francophone and Anglophone Africa"

Decentralisation in sub-Saharan Africa promises to build responsive institutions, hold officials to account and promote popular participation. Still, existent studies ignore the everyday interface between decentralised structures and citizens, as well as how decentralised institutions function in relation to their local contexts and other “authorities” on the margins. These contexts shape service provision and the impact of local power structures on local communities. Against this backdrop, our conference in Dakar, Senegal, on “Dynamics of Everyday Life within Municipal Administrations in Francophone and Anglophone Africa,” which took place in May 2019, demonstrated three key points of interest: namely, how actors within local bureaucracies interface with those who are outside; how ordinary citizens appropriate the bureaucratic techniques of the state and how these actors negotiate and adapt to the daily practices of municipal administrations. In general, decentralisation is not simply implemented, rather, it creates new frameworks and spaces for both formal and informal public action.

Sabbi, M., Doumbia, L., Neubert, D., 2020. Dynamics of Everyday Life within Municipal Administrations in Francophone and Anglophone Africa. Africa Spectrum 000203972091463. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002039720914630

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Tchokothe, R: "(au)tour de Mayotte. "Mayotte à la dérive" en dialogue avec quelques œuvres littéraires"Hide

Rémi Tchokothe est maître de conférence en Littératures Africaines et en Études des langues africaines à l‘Université de Bayreuth, Principal Investigator dans le Cluster of Excellence “Africa Multiple: Reconfiguring African Studies” et professeur associé au Centre Universitaire de Formation et de Recherche de Mayotte. Il est l’auteur de Transgression in Swahili Narrative Fiction and Its Reception (2014), co-éditeur du volume sur Les Littératures Francophones de l’Archipel des Comores (2017) et coordinateur du volume Qui a peur de la Littérature Wolof ? (2018) sur l‘oeuvre Wolophone de Boubacar Boris Diop. Il travaille actuellement sur la question de la ‚migration‘ vers Mayotte

Tchokothe, R. 2020. (au)tour de Mayotte. apropos [Perspektiven auf die Romania]. 4 (Juni 2020), 111-119. DOI:https://doi.org/10.15460/apropos.4.1527.

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Tchokothe, R: "Le petit Mahorais apprend à écrire de droite à gauche à l´école coranique. Ensuite de gauche à droite avec ...Hide

Tchokothe, R: "Le petit Mahorais apprend à écrire de droite à gauche à l´école coranique. Ensuite de gauche à droite avec l´alphabet Latin"

Auteur-Acteur-Compositeur-Dramaturge-Fondateur de maison de culture-Ancien Dj de bals poussière, Nassur Attoumani, le porteur de multiples casquettes fidèle à son casque colonial est l’une des voix artistiques les plus importantes de l’archipel des Comores. Dans cet entretien Nassur Attoumani parle des langues d’écriture et des identités littéraires, des réseaux littéraires, de l’écrivain « postcolonial » comme traducteur (in)conscient, du lectorat absent, de la crise humanitaire liée à la « migration » des îles d’Anjouan, de Mohéli et de la Grande-Comore vers Mayotte et du mythe du casque colonial qu’il porte fièrement depuis plusieurs décennies.

chokothe, Rémi„« Le petit Mahorais apprend à é crire de droite à gauche à l’école coranique. Ensuite de gauche à droite avec l’alphabet Latin ». Entretien avec l’écrivain mahorais Nassur Attoumani“, apropos [Perspektiven auf die Romania]4, 132-140. doi:10.15460/apropos.4.1528

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Vierke, Clarissa: "Poetry"Hide

This chapter offers an overview of poetry in African languages from all over the continent, which is, on the one hand, the most universal and the most specific literary form. Most African cultures did not have a specific term for literature before colonialism, but have long traditions of rhythmically bound speech reserved for special occasions and used to promote the most important ideals and aspirations of society which have proved flexible to newly emerging styles. Given the beauty, vitality, and long history of poetry and its diversity rooted in its intimate connection with respective cultural contexts, concepts of aesthetics, and language form, the chapter starts by making heuristic use of generic categories, like epic and praise poetry, to be able to both draw comparisons and highlight cultural specifics. It pays attention to poetry’s changing media across time while also going beyond the typical dichotomy of “traditional” and “modern” poetry.

2020. Vierke, Clarissa. Poetry. In Rainer Vossen and Gerrit Dimmendaal (eds): The Oxford Handbook of African Languages. Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199609895.013.5

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2020 - I


Alber, Erdmute: "Verwandtschaftshandeln in einer ökonomisch auseinanderdriftenden Gesellschaft: Eine Hochzeit in Benin"Hide
L’Homme 2020 Jg. 31, Heft 1: Ehe imperial

Eheschließung, Scheidung, Zugang zu Vermögen während und nach der Ehe, all dies war über die Jahrhunderte durch kirchliche und zivile Ordnungen strukturiert. Recht nahm damit sehr direkt Einfluss auf die persönliche Lebenspraxis. Insbesondere das 19. Jahrhundert war von zunehmender Rechtsvereinheitlichung gekennzeichnet, jedoch bestanden vor allem in größeren territorialen Zusammenhängen partikulare Rechte weiter fort. Dies konnte Möglichkeitsräume eröffnen genauso wie einen Wechsel zwischen Rechtsräumen durch Migration. Differente Zugehörigkeiten konnten umgekehrt heiratswillige Paare vor große Herausforderungen stellen. Ziel des Heftes ist es, an den Schnittstellen zwischen verschiedenen Rechtslogiken nach Handlungsräumen von Männern und Frauen und nach den damit verbundenen Geschlechternormen zu fragen.

Marriage, divorce, access to property during and after marriage, all this was structured over the centuries by ecclesiastical and civil provisions. Law thus had a very direct influence on personal life. The nineteenth century in particular was characterized by increasing legal unification, but particular rights continued to exist in larger territorial contexts. This legal heterogeneity as well as migration between different jurisdictional spaces could open up new possibilities to act. Conversely, different affiliations in regard to confession or ethnicity could pose great challenges for couples willing to marry. The aim of this issue is to ask at the interfaces between different legal logics about the spheres of action of men and women and the associated gender norms.

Alber, E., 2020. Verwandtschaftshandeln in einer ökonomisch auseinanderdriftenden Gesellschaft: Eine Hochzeit in Benin (Westafrika). L’Homme 30, 121–128.

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Boamah, Festus; Rothfuß, Eberhard: "Practical recognition" as a suitable pathway for researching just energy futuresHide

Governmental and non-governmental actors promoting the universalisation of energy access and a just energy distribution for all envision spatial energy justice and recognition. Yet how and the extent to which these considerations offer practical solutions to the energy needs and visions of different social groups simultaneously is less evident. This is particularly crucial in Ghana where a just, ‘state-driven’ electricity provision connotes recognition of privileges of citizenship and an aura of ‘modernity’. Many urban households in Ghana are keenly installing Solar Home Systems (SHS) to mitigate frequent grid power outages and ensure stability in the performance of social and energy-saving practices which grant them recognition as ‘enlightened’ social groups or as individuals staying au courant with modern energy technologies. Also, the Ghanaian government recently attempted to achieve spatial energy justice by providing free 500 W SHS to non-electrified, ‘territorially remote’ communities. Many community residents, however, claim the SHS facility restricts performances of ‘modern’ practices in comparison to fellow ‘Ghanaians’ who have access to electrical grids and that its acceptance may perpetually reduce them to ‘second-class’/‘old-fashioned citizens’. Our empirical evidence suggests that energy justice visions remain fuzzy unless they are set in relation to how and why practical solutions to the energy ‘needs’ and ‘visions’ of socially and spatially differentiated groups could be realised. We call this practical recognition. In this paper, we advocate practical recognition as a suitable alternative pathway for researching just energy futures by emphasizing connections between justice, human agency and entitlement notions.

Boamah, Festus; Rothfuß, Eberhard: "Practical recognition" as a suitable pathway for researching just energy futures: Seeing like a "modern" electricity user in Ghana. In: Energy Research & Social Science. Bd. 60 (2020), p. 1-12.

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Chang, Yongkyu (Ed.): "South Korea’s Engagement with Africa - A History of the Relationship in Multiple Aspects"Hide

This book represents the first scholarly attempt to summarize and analyze how Korea’s relationship with Africa has been shaped in policy and non-policy aspects. It shows how far it has come and where it goes. The book recognizes that Korea-Africa relations, though relatively new, break ground by acknowledging the importance of a diligent endeavor to carry out post-colonial development, and have continued to grow as we find promising progress and opportunities in the mutual cooperation between the two. This book is all-inclusive, covering Korea’s academic, economic, diplomatic, and civil engagements with Africa. It investigates untold aspects of Korea-Africa relations.

Chang, Yongkyu (Ed.): "South Korea’s Engagement with Africa - A History of the Relationship in Multiple Aspects", Palgrave Macmillan 2020.

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Clemens, Iris: "Decolonizing Knowledge : Starting Points, Consequences and Challenges"Hide

The call for the decolonization of knowledge refers to both its colonization and contingency and puts the focus on the multiplicity of knowledge. This contradicts European-North- American thinking and definitions of knowledge. Consequently, to advance an epistemological decolonization of knowledge, the actual process of defining knowledge will be analysed and the multiplicity of perspectives stressed at the epistemological level. Using Indian epistemology as an example, I will work out differences in definitions of knowledge and therefore basic diversifications in describing and explaining the emergence of knowledge. Truth-value-neutral forms of knowledge in particular challenge dominant European-North-American philosophical definitions, which incontrovertibly include assumptions of true or false knowledge. An interesting overlap between some Indian epistemologies and postcolonial theories can be observed with regards to the central role of the contextualization of knowledge production and the socially embodied nature of scientific knowledge in general. If the incentives gained are to be taken seriously, the consequences for educational science in general as well as educational practices must be discussed. According to the findings of organizational theory, emphasis on diversification and complication is also seen as an opportunity for the emergence of fresh meaning. Referring to Helen Verran’s concept of generative tension as a sign of collective creativity, encounters between diverse forms of knowledge and epistemological principles are seen as sources of creative processes and prerequisite for the emergence of new positions, perspectives etc., and thus as incubators for innovations.

In: Foro de educación. Vol. 18 (2020) Issue 1 . - pp. 11-25.

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Echtler, Magnus: "Postcolonialism, Theology and the Construction of the Other"Hide

Postcolonialism refers not only to the historical epoch after the end of the colonial era, but also to a theoretical concept for the analysis of power relations. In German-speaking theology, this concept has so far received little attention. In the bilingual volume Postcolonialism, theology and the construction of the other, scholars of all theological disciplines, including religious studies, explore the heuristic possibilities that postcolonialism provides for their subject. In particular, the question is how "the other" is constructed as the counterpart of a "we." In times of global migration and growing right-wing extremism, theology must remain capable to offer answers to the urgent questions of the present.

2020, Shembe, the Black Messiah. A postcolonial intervention, in Postcolonialism, Theology and the Construction of the Other. Exploring Borderlands, edited by Britta Konz, Bernhard Ortmann and Christian Wetz. Leiden: Brill (Studies in Theology and Religion 26), 133–169.

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Glasman, Joël: "Humanitarianism and the Quantification of Human Needs"Hide

This book provides the first historical inquiry into the quantification of needs in humanitarian assistance. Ultimately the book argues that we cannot understand the global humanitarian aid movement, if we do not understand how humanitarian agencies made human suffering commensurable across borders in the first place.

The book identifies four basic elements of needs: as a concept, as a system of classification and triage, as a form of material apparatus, and as a codified standard. Drawing on a range of archival sources ranging from the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), and the Sphere Project, the book traces the concept of needs from their emergence in the 1960s right through to the modern day, and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's call for "evidence-based humanitarianism". Finally the book assesses how the international governmentality of needs played out in a recent humanitarian crisis, drawing on detailed ethnographic research of Central African refugees in the Cameroonian borderland in 2014-2016.

This important historical enquiry into the universal nature of human suffering will be an important read for humanitarian researchers and practitioners, as well as readers with an interest in international history and development.

GLASMAN, J., 2020. HUMANITARIANISM AND THE QUANTIFICATION OF HUMAN NEEDS: minimal humanity. ROUTLEDGE

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Lingelbach, Jochen: "On the Edges of Whiteness : Polish Refugees in British Colonial Africa during and after the Second ...Hide

Lingelbach, Jochen: "On the Edges of Whiteness : Polish Refugees in British Colonial Africa during and after the Second World War"

From 1942 to 1950, nearly twenty thousand Poles found refuge from the horrors of war-torn Europe in camps within Britain's African colonies, including Uganda, Tanganyika, Kenya and Northern and Southern Rhodesia. On the Edges of Whiteness tells their improbable story, tracing the manifold, complex relationships that developed among refugees, their British administrators, and their African neighbors. While intervening in key historical debates across academic disciplines, this book also gives an accessible and memorable account of survival and dramatic cultural dislocation against the backdrop of global conflict.

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Melina Kalfelis: "NGO als Lebenswelt Transnationale Verflechtungen im Arbeitsalltag von Entwicklungsakteuren"Hide

Der Arbeitsalltag westafrikanischer Entwicklungsakteure im Rahmen von NGO-Partnerschaften ist weitgehend unerforscht. Dass viele dieser Akteure selbst an der Schwelle zu einem Phänomen stehen, das in Entwicklungsdiskursen als »Armut« bezeichnet wird, findet kaum Beachtung. Diese Ethnografie führt die paradigmatischen Veränderungen der Internationalen Zusammenarbeit mit einer Analyse eines von Unsicherheiten geprägten Alltags in Burkina Faso zusammen. An der Schnittstelle von Theorie und Empirie werden neue Einsichten zu den Verflechtungen von NGO-Praktiken in Westafrika mit transnationalen Ordnungen der Entwicklungspraxis gewonnen.

Melina Kalfelis: "NGO als Lebenswelt Transnationale Verflechtungen im Arbeitsalltag von Entwicklungsakteuren", Campus 2020.

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Ndi Shang, Gilbert: "Deconstructing postcolonial scopic regimes: The subversion of power imaginaries in the novels of ...Hide

Ndi Shang, Gilbert: "Deconstructing postcolonial scopic regimes: The subversion of power imaginaries in the novels of Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Sony Labou Tansi"

This paper examines the relationship between visuality, knowledge and power in the postcolonial African novel. With examples from selected texts of Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Sony Labou Tansi, it argues that visual culture, usually employed in the analysis of cultural images and material iconographies in media studies, can aptly be employed in textual analysis given that postcolonial novels are primarily engaged with the undoing of dominant visual regimes. Against the background of hegemonic regimes based on instrumentalist and subjectifying surveillance of the subject, Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Labou Tansi build their texts on visual tactics and practices that subvert the capacity of the state apparatus to see, hence to know the subject. Bordering on humour, parody, graffiti, bricolage and surrealist representation, the two authors “play” with the state Panopticon, creating avenues for countervailing meanings that elude the dominant regimes of vision, knowledge and power. The subversive visual practices are inscribed within a conception of literary textualities that is based on plurivocality, heteroglossia, dialogism and the non-transparent text. Through the deconstruction of dominant visual architecture, both authors open up spaces for democratic conception of power that takes account of inter-subjectivity and non-hegemonic participation in the postcolonial public sphere.

Gilbert, N.S., 2020. Deconstructing postcolonial scopic regimes: The subversion of power imaginaries in the novels of Ngugi wa Thiongo and Sony Labou Tansi. Int. J. English Lit. 11, 1–8.

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Ndi Shang, Gilbert: "The Coltan Novel: Narrating the Congolese Saga in In Koli Jean Bofane’s Congo Inc. : Le testament ...Hide

Ndi Shang, Gilbert: "The Coltan Novel: Narrating the Congolese Saga in In Koli Jean Bofane’s Congo Inc. : Le testament de Bismarck "

The Congo has consistently been a subject of wide-ranging historical and creative productions aimed at capturing its dramatic history. This has often led to the submersion of Congolese voices under exogenous and exotic depictions of Congolese realities in ways that position the Congolese subject and space as the other, void of complexity and possibility. In Koli Jean Bofane (1954) belongs to a generation of Congolese authors who “write the Congo” from within, through an inventive sensibility, an insightful worldview, and an unsettling style aimed at representing the paradoxes of the nation’s trajectory.

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Stasik, Michael; Hänsch, Valerie; Mains, Daniel: "Temporalities of waiting in Africa"Hide

The actual volume of Critical African Studies, “Temporalities of Waiting in Africa” reflects the outcome of the postdoc working group ‘Waiting for Futures’, being held at the Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies in summer 2017. The consortium convened by Michael Stasik, Valerie Hänsch and Serawit Debele was set within the overarching theme of “Future Africa and Beyond: Visions in Time” at the Bayreuth Academy (funded by the BMBF), discussed the notions of “waiting” and “waithood" that had recently received scholarly attention from African and Africanist scholars. Taking selected works as a point of departure and building on individual research projects as they relate to waiting - religious practices (Debele), forced migration (Hänsch) and mobility (Stasik) -, “waiting” was interrogated as an analytical and descriptive category. The engagement with the concomitant themes of anticipatory temporalities and imaginative productions of futures led to sharpening existent conceptual categories of the complex and often contradictory ‘territories of waiting’, especially in relation to social construction of time and temporal construction of sociality. The papers at hand originated out of intense discussions and debates during a lecture series that took place in the summer semester and a workshop at the end of September 2017 at the University of Bayreuth.

Stasik, Michael; Valerie, Hänsch; Mains, Daniel: "Temporalities of waiting in Africa". In: Critical Africal Studies.  (2020), p. 1-9.

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Vierke, Clarissa: "The Making of the ‘Classical’ Utenzi : a Consideration of the Early Editorial History of Tenzi in the 19th...Hide

Vierke, Clarissa: "The Making of the ‘Classical’ Utenzi : a Consideration of the Early Editorial History of Tenzi in the 19th and 20th Century"

In: Kandagor, Mosol ; Ogechi, Nathan O. ; Vierke, Clarissa (ed.): Lugha na fasihi katika karne ya ishirini na moja : kwa heshima ya marehemu Profesa Naoma Luchera Shitemi. - Eldoret, Kenya : Moi University Press , 2017 . - pp. 113-130, ISBN 9789966187963

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2019 - IV


Alber, Erdmute ; Kroeker, Lena:"Preparing old age in Kenya and Benin : A contribution to the debates on social differentiatio..Hide

Alber, Erdmute ; Kroeker, Lena:"Preparing old age in Kenya and Benin : A contribution to the debates on social differentiation in Africa"

Ethnizität, Bodenrecht, nationale Erinnerungspolitik und Mittelklasse – Carola Lentz hat viele ethnologische Themenfelder entscheidend weiterentwickelt. Ihre mehrfach ausgezeichneten Bücher basieren auf Feldforschungen in Westafrika, vor allem in Ghana und Burkina Faso. Auch wenn sich ihr Werk sicher nicht auf einen Begriff reduzieren lässt, zieht sich ein ausgeprägtes Interesse an „Zugehörigkeiten“ wie ein roter Faden durch ihre Forschung.

Carola Lentz reflektiert Erforschen als Interaktionsprozess, bei dem die angenommene oder verweigerte „Zugehörigkeit“ der Ethnolog*in zu den Erforschten wichtige Einsichten bringt. Insbesondere bei den Themenfeldern Ethnizität und Erinnerungspolitik untersucht sie, wie Akteure unterschiedliche „Zugehörigkeiten“ herstellen und verhandeln. Unter dem Begriff Aufführung hat sie performative Praktiken erforscht, die diese unterschiedlichen Formen von „Zugehörigkeit“ mit Leben füllen.

Dieser Sammelband, der Carola Lentz und ihr wissenschaftliches Werk anlässlich ihres 65. Geburtstags würdigt, vereint Beiträge von Kolleginnen und Kollegen aus verschiedenen Forschungskontexten. Auf ganz unterschiedliche Weise und in vielen Fällen auch inspiriert von bzw. geprägt durch die Forschung und universitäre Lehre von Carola Lentz spiegeln die Beiträge ihr Interesse am Erforschen, Verhandeln und Aufführen von Zugehörigkeiten.

In: Beek, Jan ; N’Guessan, Konstanze ; Späth, Mareike (ed.): Zugehörigkeiten : Erforschen, Verhandeln, Aufführen im Sinne von Carola Lentz. - Köln : Köppe Verlag , 2019 . - pp. 213-227 . - (Mainzer Beiträge zur Afrikaforschung ; 42 ) ISBN 978-3-89645-843-8

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Akello, Grace ; Beisel, Uli: Challenges, Distrust, and Understanding Hide

We assessed how the everyday work challenges that frontline health workers (FRHWs) face in the government health sector in northern Uganda influence their trust in the Ministry of Health (MOH). We employed qualitative research techniques, including interviews and participant observation, over a 9-month period to examine FRHWs’ viewpoints about how the MOH should address these challenges in service delivery. One hundred and sixty-five FRHWs, of whom 48 were recruited for extensive follow-up, participated in our study. Key findings include distrust in the MOH is prevalent among FRHWs, there is a lack of trust in the organization’s coordination role in service delivery and this affects health care delivery to patients, interrelations, and provider cooperation. Therefore, restoring trust in government hospitals will require a truthful non-violent response by the MOH in its contractual agreement with FRHWs. In our analysis, we employ Habermas’s Theory of Communicative Action.

Akello, Grace ; Beisel, Uli: Challenges, Distrust, and Understanding : Employing Communicative Action in Improving Trust in a Public Medical Sector in Uganda. In: SAGE Open. Vol. 9 (2019) Issue 4 . - No. 215824401989370.

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Beisel, Uli ; Ganle, John Kuumuori: The Release of Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes in Burkina FasoHide

Beisel, Uli ; Ganle, John Kuumuori: The Release of Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes in Burkina Faso : Bioeconomy of Science, Public Engagement and Trust in Medicine. In: African Studies Review. Vol. 62 (2019) Issue 3 . - pp. 164-173.

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Beisel, Uli: What might we learn from ANT for studying healthcare issues in the majority worldHide

In this contribution, I think through how ANT and related feminist science studies’ sensibilities can help us think differently about healthcare issues in the majority world. The piece discusses the implications of the methodological impulse of ANT not to divide the realms that make up the complex knots of realities. I analyse the development of the malaria vaccine MOSQUIRIX, and in this weave together questions of (i) how the vaccine relates to global and local infrastructures of healthcare provision, (ii) how it might help us to think about technological fixes and (iii) how parasites are stubborn actants in themselves whose biological complexity and changeability temper with the hopes of vaccine developers. The contribution argues that it is crucial for ANT-inspired analyses to ask what kinds of practices of caring for bodies, patients and environments fall off the agendas of philanthropists, pharmaceutical industry and global health policies? It is here, where the study of health in the majority world can inspire STS, namely in bringing the effects that situations of (often prolonged) economic, environmental and social vulnerabilities and insecurities have on bodies (human and parasite alike), minds, infrastructures, our living environments and landscapes more broadly to the fore.

Beisel, Uli: What might we learn from ANT for studying healthcare issues in the majority world, and what might ANT learn in turn? In: Blok, Anders ; Farias, Ignacio ; Roberts, Celia (ed.): The Routledge Companion to Actor-Network Theory. - London : Routledge , 2019 . - pp. 246-255

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Clemens, Iris: Comment : Cultural Identities in Multilocal Spaces : bringing in multiplicity.Hide

The comment emphasizes upon the trinity of identity, space and connections or relations, referring to the contributions of the special issue. This perspective is used to ask for a concept of culture capturing the relationality of the social. Following the relational approach, any social actor has many identities while moving permanently between many social figurations, as e.g. network theory (White 2008) as a theory of the betweeness points out. Accordingly, a conceptualization of multiplicity of identities is a necessary component of theoretical approaches that catch up with these insights in a general emphasis on multiplicity (e.g. of space). What becomes visible is, that to grasp the multiplicity, fluidity and dynamics as well as the interdependency of identities and spaces (multilocal or else), their relationality must be focused upon. This challenges older disparities like local-global as well. In that sense, relationality is the key to bring identities, spaces and cultures together and integrate them into one concept that is capable of describing and analysing such different experiences represented in this volume.

Clemens, Iris: Comment : Cultural Identities in Multilocal Spaces : bringing in multiplicity
In: Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education : Studies of Migration, Integration, Equity, and Cultural Survival Bd. 13 (2019) Heft 1. - S. 68-72.

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Clemens, Iris: Projekt: Exzellenzcluster Africa multiple : Reconfiguring African Studies an der Universität Bayreuth Hide

Clemens, Iris:
Projekt: Exzellenzcluster Africa multiple : Reconfiguring African Studies an der Universität Bayreuth und die Research Section learning.
In: Erziehungswissenschaft. Bd. 30 (2019) Heft 58. - S. 126-127.

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Dieter, Neubert: "Inequality, Socio-cultural Differentiation and Social Structures in Africa"Hide

This book contends that conventional class concepts are not able to adequately capture social inequality and socio-cultural differentiation in Africa. Earlier empirical findings concerning ethnicity, neo-traditional authorities, patron-client relations, lifestyles, gender, social networks, informal social security, and even the older debate on class in Africa, have provided evidence that class concepts do not apply; yet these findings have mostly been ignored.

For an analysis of the social structures and persisting extreme inequality in African societies – and in other societies of the world – we need to go beyond class, consider the empirical realities and provincialise our conventional theories. This book develops a new framework for the analysis of social structure based on empirical findings and more nuanced approaches, including livelihood analysis and intersectionality, and will be useful for students and scholars in African studies and development studies, sociology, social anthropology, political science and geography.

Neubert, D., 2019. Inequality, Socio-cultural Differentiation and Social Structures in Africa: Beyond Class. Springer International Publishing, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17111-7

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Fendler, Ute: "Cinema is a country: The transgressive power of images in The Sea is Behind by Hicham Lasri"Hide

Since 2013, the Moroccan filmmaker Hicham Lasri has released a film each year, each of which has met with success at international festivals. All of these films transgress narrative and aesthetic cinematic boundaries, and The Sea is Behind (2015) is no exception: in a fable about the relations between human beings in a society that is losing its ethical and moral orientations, it invites us to consider our perception of the Other. The first part of the article addresses the active construction of its narrative from narrative fragments; the second part focuses on the ways in which the film's fragmented/composite narrative structure is reinforced by aesthetic means, so that, as the complex theme of the position and perception of marginalized groups is developed, new perspectives open up at the interstices, creating an impression of the dehumanizing conditions of life in this society.

"Le cinéma est un pays ..." (‘Cinema is a country’) or the transgressive power of images in The sea is behind by Hicham Lasri.” In: Journal of African Cinemas. 2019, 25-36.

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Glasman, Joël: Humanitarianism and the Quantification of Human Needs. Minimal HumanityHide

This book provides an historical inquiry into the quantification of needs in humanitarian assistance. Needs are increasingly seen as the lowest common denominator of humanity. Standard definitions of basic needs, however, set a minimalist version of humanity – both in the sense that it is narrow in what it compares, and that it sets a low bar for satisfaction. The book argues that we cannot understand humanitarian governance if we do not understand how humanitarian agencies made human suffering commensurable across borders in the first place. Drawing on a range of archival sources, including the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), and the Sphere Project, the book traces the concept of needs from its emergence in the 1960s right through to the present day, and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s call for “evidence-based humanitarianism.” This historical inquiry into the universal nature of human suffering will be an important read for humanitarian researchers and practitioners, as well as readers with an interest in international history and development.

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Gunkel, Henriette ; Lynch, Kara : We Travel the Space WaysHide

A new take on Afrofuturism, this book gathers together a range of contemporary voices who, carrying legacies of 500 years of contact between Africa, Europe, and the Americas, reach towards the stars and unknown planets, galaxies, and ways of being. Writing from queer and feminist perspectives and circumnavigating continents, they recalibrate definitions of Afrofuturism. The editors and contributors of this exciting volume thus reflect upon the re-emergence of Black visions of political and cultural futures, proposing practices, identities, and collectivities.

With contributions from AfroFuturist Affair, John Akomfrah, Jamika Ajalon, Stefanie Alisch, Jim Chuchu, Grisha Coleman, Thomas F. DeFrantz, Abigail DeVille, M. Asli Dukan with Wildseeds, Kodwo Eshun, Anna Everett, Raimi Gbadamosi, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Milumbe Haimbe, Ayesha Hameed, Kiluanji Kia Henda, Kara Keeling, Carla J. Maier, Tobias Nagl, Tavia Nyongo, Rasheedah Phillips, Daniel Kojo Schrade, Nadine Siegert, Robyn Smith, Greg Tate and Frohawk Two Feathers.

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Katsakioris, Constantin: Students from Portuguese Africa in the Soviet Union, 1960–74Hide

A major ally of the Marxist-inspired liberation movements, which fought against Portuguese colonialism in Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Cape Verde, and Mozambique, the Soviet Union provided them with not only military, but also civil aid in the form of scholarships. This paper focuses on the training of students from Portuguese Africa in the USSR. While it provides data and analyzes the importance and the complexities of educational assistance in the context of anti-colonial revolutions, it also sheds light on the tensions and serious conflicts that cast a shadow over the relationships between students and leaders. Students who created opposition groups and were accused of plotting against the leaders, criticizing the USSR, or trying to postpone their return to the motherland were repatriated and punished. Others managed to migrate and pursued their opposition from the West. Confronted with these phenomena, the party leaders grew disillusioned and reduced the number of students studying in the Soviet Union.

Katsakioris, Constantin: Students from Portuguese Africa in the Soviet Union, 1960–74: Anti-colonialism, Education, and the Socialist Alliance. In: Journal of Contemporary History

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Ndi-Shang, Gil: Letter from America - Memoir of an Adopted ChildHide

Inspired by Alistair Cooke’s masterpiece “Letter from America” (1934-2004) that depicted the transformation of British culture in the United States of America, Ndi-Shang’s text redefines ‘America’, focusing on the melting pot engendered by African, indigenous, European and Asian cultures in Latin America through the case of Peru, the erstwhile epicentre of Spanish empire in Latin America. It is a reflection on the triangular relationship between Africa, Europe and America against the backdrop of slavery and (neo-)colonialism which continue to define intimate experiences, daily interactions, personal trajectories and human relations in a ‘globalized world’. Ndi-Shang probes into the legacies of racial inequalities but also the possibilities of a new ethic of encounter amongst human beings/cultures. The text is based on an intricate interweaving of the humorous with the tragic, the personal with the global, the historical with the current and the real with the creative.

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Nyeck, Sybille: Routledge Handbook of Queer African StudiesHide

This handbook offers diverse perspectives on queer Africa, incorporating scholarly contributions on themes that reflect and inflect the trajectories of queer contributions to African studies within and outside academia.

The Routledge Handbook of Queer African Studies incorporates a range of unique perspectives, reflecting ongoing struggles between regimes of inclusion and those of transformation premised upon different relational and reflexive engagements between queer embodiment and Africa’s subjectivities. All sections of this handbook blend contributions from public intellectuals and practitioners with academic reflections on topics not limited to neoliberalism, social care, morality and ethics, social education, and technology, through the lens of queer African studies. The book renders visible the ongoing transformations and resistance within African societies as well as the inventiveness of queer presence in negotiating belonging.

This handbook will be of interest to students and scholars of gender and sexuality in Africa, queer studies, and African culture and society.

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Richards, Paul, et al.: Trust, and distrust, of Ebola Treatment Centers : A case-study from Sierra LeoneHide

The paper considers local responses to the introduction of an Ebola Treatment Centre in eastern Sierra Leone during the West African epidemic of 2014–15. Our study used qualitative methods consisting of focus groups and interviews, to gather responses from patients, members of the families of survivors and deceased victims of the disease, social liaison workers from the centre, and members of the general public. The data indicate that scepticism and resistance were widespread at the outset, but that misconceptions were replaced, in the minds of those directly affected by the disease, by more positive later assessments.

Social workers, and social contacts of families with workers in the centre, helped reshape these perceptions, but a major factor was direct experience of the disease. This is apparent in the positive endorsements by survivors and families who had members taken to the facility. Even relatives of deceased victims agreed that the case-handling centre was valuable.

However, we also present evidence of continuing scepticism in the minds of members of the general public, who continue to suspect that Ebola was a crisis manufactured for external benefit. Our conclusions stress the importance of better connectivity between communities and Ebola facilities to facilitate experiential learning. There is also a need to address the wider cognitive shock caused by a well-funded Ebola health initiative arriving in communities
with a long history of inadequate health care. Restoring trust in medicine requires Ebola Virus Disease to be re-contextualized within a broader framework of concern for the health of all citizens.

Richards, Paul ; Mokuwa, Esther ; Maat, Harro ; Welmers, Pleun ; Beisel, Uli: Trust, and distrust, of Ebola Treatment Centers : A case-study from Sierra Leone. In: PLoS One. Vol. 14 (December 2019) Issue 12 . - No. e0224511.

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Schramm, Katharina; Balkenhol, Markus: "Doing race in Europe: contested pasts and contemporary practices"Hide

In this introduction to the special section on ‘Doing Race in Europe’ we take up the notion of race as an ‘absent presence’ to deal with two related issues. First, we consider the historically contested position of race in the discipline of anthropology. Second, we think through the notion of an ‘absent presence’ conceptually and methodologically so as to develop a relational approach enabling us to analyse race in practice. We take as a point of departure the idea that we cannot know race in advance, and that we therefore need to study how it comes about, and how it is made and unmade in specific situations. We therefore call for renewed ethnographic attention to how race is made absent and present in multiple ways. This special section is the first joint publication of the EASA network for the anthropology of race and ethnicity (ARE).

Balkenhol, M., Schramm, K., 2019. Doing race in Europe: contested pasts and contemporary practices. Soc Anthropol 27, 585–593.

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Schramm, Katharina; Beaudevin, Claire: "Sorting, typing, classifying"Hide

The elephant in the room is huge, but quiet. It is so taken for granted that it melts into the tapestry. Nobody in the room notes its presence. Though disregarded, it is still strikingly present, a massive force that people must walk around if they wish to move within the room.

The metaphor of this troubling pachyderm, of course, is well known and widely used (see, for example, Krueger 2017; Thomas 2016). The figurative elephant in the room alludes to issues that seem obvious, but are so disturbing that they are actively ignored or put aside to ensure business as usual. In our view, the resulting spectrum of ignorance goes from voluntary blindness to the point where, hidden in plain sight, the obvious and disturbing issues may actuallynot be known by some of the protagonists.

In this think piece, which accompanies our special section on the problem of classification in ethnography, we suggest that matters of classification, categorization, and typology in all of their shades constitute an ‘elephant in the room’ of ethnographic field research and writing, both an obvious and invisible part of our anthropological epistemology. We decided to use the metaphor of the elephant in the room to guide us in this text, as we address questions of methodology, positionality, epistemology, and representation in ways we deem heuristic.

Schramm, K., Beaudevin, C., 2019. Sorting, typing, classifying: The elephants in our ethnographic rooms. MAT 6, 276–290.

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Tchokothe, Rémi Armand: "Kiswahili literature in crisis"Hide

The substantial number of Kiswahili prose works published since the 1990s and the growing interest in their analysis play down some drawbacks that make Kiswahili literature vulnerable. Contrary to the usual celebrations of these texts, this article presents the other side of the coin, which suggests a potential crisis in Kiswahili literature. The article begins with Obi Wali’s plea for African literatures to be written in African languages, before narrowing it down to Kiswahili literature. The article shows that although writers in Kiswahili have between the 1970s and the 1990s qualitatively as well as quantitatively responded to Wali’s call, one needs to critically assess works published since the end of the 1990s and especially since the early 2000s. One needs to reconsider the question posed by Matundura: ‘what ails Kiswahili literature?’ This article explores the following challenges facing Kiswahili literature: authorial (im)posture and the ‘death of the critic’; ‘felicitous borrowings’; the demise of editing and the school book race and writers in Kiswahili; and Western midwives and disconnected readers.

Tchokothe, R.A., 2020. Kiswahili literature in crisis. South African Journal of African Languages 40, 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1080/02572117.2019.1672338

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Tchokothe, Rémi Armand: "A European border in Africa"Hide

A cursory glance at the world map would sug-gest the Comoros, an archipelago in the In-dian Ocean consisting of four main islands, forms a single geographical unit. But a very eventful his-tory, shaped in many respects by colonialism, has led to the fact that its political, social, and cultural conditions today are very complicated.

A European Border in Africa : the Comoros in the focus of literary criticism.  In: Spektrum. Vol. 15/2 (November 2019). - S. 78-82.

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Tchokothe, Rémi Armand: "Swahili as a medium of decolonization"Hide

Swahili as a medium of decolonization.  In: Spektrum. Vol. 15/2 (November 2019). - S. 78-82.

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Vierke, Clarissa: "Other Worlds: The “Prophet’s Ascension” as World Literature and its Adaptation in Swahili-speaking East...Hide

Vierke, Clarissa: "Other Worlds: The “Prophet’s Ascension” as World Literature and its Adaptation in Swahili-speaking East Africa"

World literature as a study beyond paradigms of national literature is a seemingly open project inviting to study any transnational or transcontinental circulation of texts. So far, however, in many studies, circulation has largely been measured by a text’s contribution to the Western literary reservoir. In this contribution, my aim is to broaden the view on world literature by leaving the West as point of temporal, spatial or intertextual reference. I will open up another perspective on the circulation of texts across space, time and languages in a “world” outside of the West. More specifically, I will take the example of a ramified Islamic text, the so-called micrāj, the story of how the Prophet Muhammad travelled the heavens in one night. After outlining its broad circulation, I will follow the story of the Prophet’s ascension to the Swahili-speaking coast of East Africa at the shore of the Indian Ocean. By reversing the perspective and focusing on the “small” Swahili literature, into which the Islamic narrative becomes adapted, my contribution does not only study different adaptations, but also questions the novelty and uniqueness of transnational and -continental circulation, often celebrated as a product of Western modern times and its new outlook on both the nation and the world.

2019. Other Worlds: The “Prophet’s Ascension” as World Literature and its Adaptation in Swahili-speaking East Africa. In: Dieter Lamping, Galin Tihanov and Matthias Bortmuth (eds.): Vergleichende Weltliteraturen / Comparative World Literatures. Stuttgart: Metzler 215-229.

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2019 - III


Alber, Erdmute ; Martin, Jeannett: "Multiplicities of Kinship and Family in Africa"Hide

In: Ross, Friso ; Treichel, Stephanie ; Lutz, Ronald (ed.): Sozialarbeit des Südens. Band 7. Family Structures in Change - Challenges of Transitional Phenomena. - Oldenburg : Paulo Freire Verlag , 2019 . - pp. 17-35 . - (Internationale Sozialarbeit ; 7 )
ISBN 978-3-86585-915-0

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Arndt, Susan; Assa, Shirin: "Kolonialismus und Moderne: Konzepte des Transnationalen aus postkolonialer Perspektive"Hide

Das Verhältnis von Literatur und Transnationalität ist bislang vornehmlich in Einzelstudien thematisiert worden. Das Handbuch führt erstmals systematisch und historisch die aktuell diskutierten Forschungsperspektiven und den in verschiedener Hinsicht erprobten besonderen Erkenntniswert des Begriffs der Transnationalität– etwa gegenüber Internationalität und Transkulturalität – für die kulturwissenschaftlich fundierte Literaturforschung zusammen. In einer Vielzahl von Beiträgen zu theoretischen Grundlagen und methodischen Konzepten dokumentiert der Band, dass die Konjunktur des Begriffs – in Soziologie, Ökonomie, Politik- und Geschichtswissenschaft, Migrations- und Urbanitätsforschung – mittlerweile auch die Literaturwissenschaften erreicht und ein interdisziplinär äußerst produktives Forschungsfeld eröffnet hat. Überblicksdarstellungen und Einzelanalysen reflektieren Wirkmächtigkeit und Grenzen nationalliterarischer Kategorisierung in Literaturen der Gegenwart wie in historischer Perspektive und führen exemplarisch Formen und Verfahren transnationaler Literatur vor.

Arndt, Susan und Shirin Assa. “Kolonialismus und Moderne. Konzepte des Transnationalen aus postkolonialer Perspektive.“ Handbuch Literatur und Transnationalität. Ed. by Doerte Bischof & Susanne Komfort-Hein. Reihe "Handbücher zur kulturwissenschaftlichen Philologie" ed. by von Claudia Benthien, Ethel Matala de Mazza & Uwe Wirth. Berlin: De Gruyter Verlag: 351-365

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Arndt, Susan: "The Ethics of (Lacking) Responsibility in the Humanities"Hide

Arndt, Susan: "The Ethics of (Lacking) Responsibility in the Humanities: A Comment on Will Bridges’s “A Brief History of the Inhumanities”

The humanities have had a frustrating share in the inhumanities committed in the name of humanism. Scientific racism and African studies as kith and kin of colonialism and Maafa are just the tip of the iceberg. We need to revisit this history critically and with visions of what the new humanities should look like. In doing so, unlike Bridges, the article acknowledges the rich efforts of “critical humanities” as displayed within gender, postcolonial, disability, and posthuman studies. Thus framed, the article will delve into a genealogical rereading of Western humanism and its humanities that bridges antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and the longevity of the futures thereof. In doing so, it will focus on the entanglement of humanism/humanity and colonialism/racism, while starting off from a posthumanist complication of the culture/nature divide.

Susan Arndt, "The Ethics of (Lacking) Responsibility in the Humanities: A Comment on Will Bridges’s “A Brief History of the Inhumanities”," History of Humanities 4, no. 1 (Spring 2019): 27-39.

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Beisel, Uli: The Release of Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes in Burkina FasoHide

This commentary discusses the current release of genetically engineered mosquitoes in Burkina Faso as part of malaria control interventions. We explore three key issues relating to the releases, namely firstly the question if the scientific intervention is safe and sound, secondly if public engagement measure were genuine and sufficient, and thirdly the question of how the biotechnical innovation relates to other malaria control interventions. We close with some reflections on trust in biomedicine and how this can be fostered in processes of biomedical trials on the African continent.

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Daniel, Antje; Neubert, Dieter: "Civil society and social movements: conceptual insights and challenges in African contexts"Hide

The debate on different forms of political mobilization and self-organization in Africa refers to the established concepts of civil society and social movements. Knowing that the majority of studies on civil society and social movements focus on the Global North, we ask whether these concepts may be applied to Africa. We need to consider different forms of self-organization and the potential limits of the concepts. At the same time, ‘unusual cases’ from Africa may help us to sharpen our understanding of the concepts and to explore their analytical range and borders. This applies particularly to the observation that the terms civil society and social movement are often used interchangeably, which ignores the existing differences between the concepts. Therefore, we first consider their different perspectives: A study of civil society analyses the features of associations in a public sphere or arena and their role in politics and society. A study of social movements looks at processes of mobilization and action. Second, we point out the normative implications of the two concepts, especially with regard to liberal democracy, degree of politicization and relation to violence.

Antje Daniel & Dieter Neubert 2019: Civil Society and Social Movements: Conceptual Insights and Challenges in African Contexts. Critical African Studies. Online first. 

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Drescher, Martina: "Between Ignorance and Knowledge: Posters as Medium in HIV/AIDS Campaigns in Francophone Africa"Hide

Drescher, Martina (2019): Between Ignorance and Knowledge: Posters as Medium in HIV/AIDS Campaigns in Francophone Africa. In: Groß, Alexandra / Pech, Ramona / Vlassenko, Ivan (Hg.): HIV/AIDS. Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven. Münster: Lit Verlag, 149-184.

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Fendler, Ute; Fink, Katharina; Siegert, Nadine; Vierke, Ulf (ed.): Revolution 3.0 - Iconographies of Radical Change.Hide

From the visual politics of the FRELIMO-liberation script in Mozambique via the brooms and spoons of Le Balai Citoyen in Burkina Faso, to the updating of images from past revolutions on Twitter and Facebook, often in the diaspora – images play a key role in the envisioning of futures and social utopia. And more than that: Revolutions, understood as moments of radical social and cultural change, are driven by images, as empirical investigations on- and offline show. But what actually constitutes the ‘seismographic power’ of images, and the sustainability of icons from past ruptures in terms of radicalism, such as the portraits of Burkina Faso’s and Mozambiques first presidents‚ Thomas Sankara and Samora Machel? What possibilities do images offer – and what is cut and edited in the process of creating a ‘new’ image? How do the visual tactics of analogue and digital protesters alike constitute, alter and create visual and multi-media archives?
This book brings together a wide range of papers by international researchers and artists focusing on the relationship of images and revolution mostly in the African context. Images in various artistic media such as photography, art in public space, performance, fashion are discussed, but also the relation of visual culture and politics in Mozambique, Angola and Burkina Faso among others.

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Fendler, Ute: "Icons of Political Leaders - from Sacral to Popular Images"Hide

In: Fendler, Ute ; Fink, Katharina ; Siegert, Nadine ; Vierke, Ulf (ed.): Revolution 3.0 : Iconographies of Radical Change. - München : AVM Edition , 2019 . - pp. 34-51
ISBN 978-3-95477-090-8

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Fendler, Ute: "Responding to Onejoon Che. The monument “Renaissance d’Afrique"Hide

In: Fendler, Ute ; Fink, Katharina ; Siegert, Nadine ; Vierke, Ulf (ed.): Revolution 3.0 : Iconographies of Radical Change. - München : AVM Edition , 2019 . - pp. 192-207
ISBN 978-3-95477-090-8

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Gruber, Valerie V. V.: "Relational Geographies of Afro-Brazilian Identities : What Can We Learn from the Candeal ...Hide

Gruber, Valerie: "Relational Geographies of Afro-Brazilian Identities : What Can We Learn from the Candeal Neighborhood in Salvador Da Bahia (Brazil)?"

In: Depkat, Volker ; Waldschmidt-Nelson, Britta ; Falk, Jasmin (ed.): Cultural Mobility and Knowledge Formation in the Americas. - Heidelberg : Universitätsverlag Winter , 2019 . - pp. 95-119 . - (Publikationen der Bayerischen Amerika-Akademie ; 20 )
ISBN 978-3-8253-6948-4

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Haferburg, Christoph; Rothfuss, Eberhard: Relational UrbanityHide

Current debates in urban studies are questioning the theoretical and empirical adequacy of the term city for understanding urban dynamics, North and South. A related concern is the arbitrariness of delimitations of expanding, interwoven and hyper-connected agglomerations. Established regionalizations of urban areas or cities are thus fading away in more than one sense, demanding conceptual and methodological consequences. Building on these debates, the paper stresses the relevance of societal or socio-spatial dimensions of urbanity. The need to contextualize them across scales finds its expression in the term global urban society. Taking this idea further, we propose a research programme centred on a conceptual and empirical investigation of a relational urbanity.

Haferburg, Christoph; Rothfuss, Eberhard, Relational Urbanity: Perspectives of a Global Urban Society beyond Universalism and Localism Relationale Urbanität: Perspektiven einer globalen urbanen Gesellschaft jenseits von Universalismus und Lokalismus, Geographische Zeitschrift, Volume 107, Number 3, July 2019, pp. 166-187(22).

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Katsakioris, Constantin: The Lumumba University in Moscow: higher education for a Soviet–Third World alliance, 1960–91Hide

Founded in Moscow in 1960 for students from Third World countries, the Peoples’ Friendship University ‘Patrice Lumumba’ was the most important venture in international higher education during the Cold War and a flagship of Soviet internationalism. It aimed to educate a Soviet-friendly intelligentsia and foster a Soviet–Third World alliance. This article retraces the history of this school, often criticized for its Third World concept, recruitment, and training policies. It recalls the forgotten French initiative to create a university for the underdeveloped countries, situates Lumumba University in the global Cold War, and compares it with mainstream Soviet schools. Soon after its creation, Lumumba University underwent important changes, but departed from its initial educational concept. Consequently, arguments justifying the existence of a special university disappeared. Third World countries, moreover, never agreed with the university’s concept. Despite its educational accomplishments, Lumumba University became the Achilles’ heel of Soviet cultural policy.

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Netz, Sabine; Lempp Sarah, Krause Kristine and Schramm Katharina, eds. Special Issue Citizenship Studies 23 (7).Hide

What have affirmative action policies, categorization of care needs, plastic surgery, forensic identification of dead bodies and age assessments of refugees in common? They all determine recognition and access to resources and rights via the body. In the introduction to this special issue, the editors emphasize that the body only becomes distinct and significant when it is put in relation to historically and geographically differing norms and standards. This relational approach opens up the ‘black boxes’ of science, medicine, bureaucracy and eventually the body. Drawing on practice theory, critical citizenship studies and Science and Technology Studies, the authors discuss notions of social citizenship and the conceptualization of biological citizenship in medical anthropology. They think with the contributions of the special issue that analyse how medical practitioners, state and private institutions, as well as individuals enact certain bodies in specific material and discursive constellations. By taking neither citizenship nor the body for granted, the special issue shows how situationally-bound elements in relations, space and time, matter for a person’s access to rights and resources – and hence can draw attention to blind spots in particular categorization practices.

Sabine Netz, Sarah Lempp, Kristine Krause and Katharina Schramm, eds. (2019): Special Issue „Claiming Citizenship Rights through the Body Multiple“. Citizenship Studies 23 (7).

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Neubert, Dieter: "What We Can Learn from the Fading Myth of the (African) “Middle Class” "Hide

Less than ten years ago we observed a kind of media hype over the “new” middle class in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. This was considered as a large new group of consumers and the most optimistic researchers underlined that they would also be the backbone of a new global movement towards democracy and good governance (Birdsall 2016). Indeed, income figures justify the idea that there is a growing group of people who have climbed above the US $2.00 per capita/day poverty line. And in Asia and Latin America a considerable part of the population has a per capita income of ten or even twenty US dollars a day. In times of growing critique in post-development and post-colonial studies of development policy, including critique of the concept of “development” itself, this global middle class seems to verify the success of the concept of economic development and economic growth.

Dieter Neubert 2019: What we can learn from the fading myth of the (African) “middle class”. Global-E September 17, 2019, Volume12, Issue 40           

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Neubert, Dieter: "Nation, Ethnicity, Milieus, and Multiple “We’s”. The Case of Kenya"Hide

The title of the volume “Future Africa—beyond the nation?” has several implications. Nation is presented as an entity relevant to identification and identity; and in the combination with “future”, nation implies a political vision. It is not hard to find good examples in respect of these implications. However, there are other entities important for to political identification. Often, they do not go beyond the nation but refer to smaller collective identities, such as ethnicity. The revived debate on “the middle class” implies that particular social groupings, such as class, may play a role, too. The question is how relevant are the nation and other collective political identities in Africa, and are they exclusive? Looking at the case of Kenya, we see on the one hand that collective (political) identities, such as ethnicity, are mobilized especially during elections. On the other hand, these collective identities are less dominant in everyday life and give way to different conducts of life (conceptualized as “milieus”) that are less politicized. We see people maneuvering between multiple “we’s”. Strong political identities are mobilized only in particular conflict-loaded situations that restructure identities in simple binary oppositions of “we” and “they”.

Dieter Neubert 2019: Nation, ethnicity, milieus and multiple “we’s”. The case of Kenya. Humanities 19, (8) 3, special issue “Beyond the nation”.

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Tchokothe, Rémi Armand: "Archiving Collective Memories and (Dis)owning"Hide

This paper investigates the question of ownership of collective memories in the age of digitized archiving. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s (henceforth Unesco) philosophy of preserving the world cultural heritage has boosted research on African oral literatures. The emphasis on the documentation of endangered cultures of Africa is salutary but also raises some critical questions. The central question this contribution addresses is that of the authorship-ownership of cultural heritage that is being archived in the framework of digital humanities. In essence, the notion of “collective memories” entails that of collective authorship and collective belonging as these memories are passed on from one generation to the other without the claim of singular ownership. A significant example in this line of thought has been the observation by the cultural giant Amadou Hampâté Bâ who ironically pointed out that the real author of The Fortunes of Wangrin (1973), which is attributed to him, is actually the storyteller Wangrin – the cunning interpreter – and members of the whole literary tradition that Wangrin embodied. In the preface of a recently published volume on La question de l’auteur en littératures africaines (Jérôme Roger 2015: 16) the author asks the following pertinent question: how can African literature, both oral and others, invite scholars to rethink the relationship between the anonymity of sources, versions and variants of stories and the constraint for an author’s name imposed by editors? The question has more weight in view of the massive digitization of African oral literatures that mostly takes place in institutions with more economic prestige and which are located outside the African continent. Therefore, the interrogation centres on the role of power with regard to the form in which these (hi)stories are published, where, how and to whom they are accessible, and to the habit of researchers to name people from whom they receive the bulk of knowledge which they transcribe and translate into the academic jargon “informants” instead of giving them more credit by referring to them as research partners or even by recognising them as co-authors. In this vein, the paper rounds up by exploring the possibility of reversing the customary auctorial perspective by bringing into the discussion the idea of “researchers as griots” suggested by (Merolla, Ameka & Dorvlo 2013).

Tchokothe, R.A., 2019. Archiving Collective Memories and (Dis)owning. AF 32. https://doi.org/10.21825/af.v32i1.11792

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Tchokothe, Rémi Armand: "Le camfranglais et la camerounité diasporique relationnelle en Allemagne"Hide

Le  camfranglais  est  cette  langue  hybride  issue  du  contact  entre  les  langues  autochtones  camerounaises,  le  français,  l’anglais,  le  pidgin-English et même les langues immigrées parlées au Cameroun. Si plusieurs études ont analysé la situation de cette langue au Cameroun, ce  livre  est  le  tout  premier  qui  se  propose  d’analyser  de  manière  systématique   les   pratiques   langagières   des   camfranglophones   en   contexte diasporique. Il explore les nouveaux espaces du camfranglais en  focalisant  l’attention  sur  les  principaux  pays  d’immigration  des  Camerounais  en  Occident,  ainsi  que  sur  les  zones  fufuldéphone  et  anglophone du Cameroun. Les   auteurs   analysent   les   pistes   interprétatives   qui   sous-tendent   l’émergence  du  camfranglais  hors  des  frontières  du  Cameroun,  mais  aussi  dans  les  réseaux  sociaux  enrichis  par  les  discours  électroniques,  à  travers  une  démarche  interdisciplinaire  qui  embrasse  aussi  bien  la  sémiotique et l’ethnologie, que la sociolinguistique de l’immigration et de la globalisation.Un ouvrage novateur sur la dynamique sociolinguistique en Afrique

Siebetcheu, R. (Ed.), 2019. Le camfranglais dans le monde global: contextes migratoires et perspectives sociolinguistiques. L’Harmattan, Paris.

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Zoanni, Tyler: “Appearances of Disability and Christianity in Uganda” Hide

This article considers how Christianity contributes to the appearance of cognitive disability in Uganda, a country with some of the most progressive disability policies in the world but little in the way of formal care and advocacy for cognitively disabled people. As a point of departure, the article invokes Hannah Arendt’s notion of appearance as a way to thematize the importance of public display in Ugandan social life, as well as the challenge that people with evidently profound disabilities pose to Ugandan social aesthetics. It first traces how cognitive disability disappears under the liberal logics that organize Uganda’s secular disability laws and activism, and then compares the ways that Catholic and Pentecostal efforts sustain the appearance of cognitive disability, in light of their theological differences and their common paternalism. Even as Christian paternalism in the face of cognitive disability may prove repugnant to a liberal vision of disability politics, I argue that it sustains a form of disability appearance otherwise not possible in Uganda.

Zoanni, T., 2019. Appearances of Disability and Christianity in Uganda. Cult. Anthropol. 34.

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Zoanni, Tyler: "Population (What is It Good For?) "Hide

We invoke the anti-Vietnam War song "War" because a spirit of urgency—not unlike the song's own—animates contemporary reflections on population as a global problem.1 The spirit of defiance found in that song also appears in some of the books we review here: three slim volumes that raise questions about the uses and abuses of the notion of population. This notion does much work in contemporary economic and development policy, as well as in debates about migration to the EU and the US. It creeps up in nationalist ideas about safeguarding the imagined roots of many Euro-American societies, and it is the centerpiece of dystopic visions of out-of-control numbers that endanger the entire planet.

Calkins, S., Zoanni, T., 2019. Population (What is It Good For?). Anthropological Quarterly 92, 919–929.

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2019 - II


Arndt, Susan: "Vorwort zur Gründung der Buchreihe Transkulturelle Literaturstudien."Hide

Das Buch 'Ent-Täuschung des weißen Blicks. Rassismussensible Strategien für eine ideologiekritische Filmanalyse' ist ein Handbuch für alle, die Rassismus in Filmen identifizieren und dekonstruieren möchten. Durch die Re-Lektüre des Ursprungstextes der feministischen Filmtheorie wird die Grammatik rassifizierter Repräsentation, die bislang vor allem von Schwarzen Theoretiker_innen in verschiedenen Einzelwerken erarbeitet wurde, zusammengeführt und systematisiert.

Für diese Systematisierung liest Julia Dittmann den Ursprungstext der feministischen Filmtheorie 'Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema' von Laura Mulvey mit einer spezifizierten Lesart des symbolischen Phallus nach Lacan und weitet Mulveys gendersensiblen Analyseansatz zu einer diversitätssensiblen Analysemöglichkeit von Filmtexten aus. Die als Fazit entstehende und einfach zu handhabende Analysematrix fokussiert rassismussensible Strategien für eine ideologiekritische Filmanalyse.

Zur Entwicklung dieser Analysematrix wird die in okzidentale Mainstream-Spielfilme eingeschriebene Ideologie des Rassismus anhand der Blockbuster Eine Weiße unter Kannibalen (D 1921), Geschichte einer Nonne (USA 1959), Jenseits von Afrika (USA 1986) und Die weiße Massai (D 2005) offengelegt und inszenatorische Gegenstrategien anhand des Third Cinema-Klassikers La Noire de. (Kamerun/Fr 1966) von Ousmane Sembène aufgezeigt.

Arndt, Susan. „Vorwort zur Gründung der Buchreihe Transkulturelle Literaturstudien.“ in: Dittmann, Julia. Die Enttäuschung des weißen Blicks. Rassismussensible Strategien für eine ideologiekritische Filmanalyse. Münster: edition assemblage: 1-24

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Clemens, Iris; Biswas, Tanushree: "Rethinking education in times of globalization – but where to start the rethinking?"Hide

Dysfunctionality of education – or to be more precise time spent in institutions meant to be installed for the purpose of education – is a problem that attracts attention globally. Apparently reports and studies show that in many contexts, not only due to bad conditions such as lack of facilities, absence of teachers (Abadzi 2009; De and Dreze 1999; De et al. 2011) etc., but also because of the inadequate form and content of education, children leave school after years of boredom and helpless disciplinary actions without the ability to read, write and/or be able to contribute a meaningful share to their community (Jeffrey et. al. 2004, 2005; Pillai 2013). Contrary, the socialisation in these institutions can alienate the young community members from their community and leave them without any competencies, be it for subsistence economy on the one hand or white-collar employment in global economy on the other (ibid.). Beside this urgent need for transformations in the given educational sector, it seems to be very difficult if not impossible to even think of alternative forms of education that are substantially different to the hegemonic concept of education found globally. In the following pages, we analyse more detailed the underlying concept of universal education and why thinking of alternative ways in education is so difficult, but urgent. Our assumption is that the very idea of singularity is part of the problem.

In: Clemens, Iris ; Hornberg, Sabine ; Rieckmann, Marco (ed.): Bildung und Erziehung im Kontext globaler Transformationen. - Berlin : Verlag Barbara Budrich , 2019 . - pp. 237-250 . - (Schriftenreihe: "Ökologie und Erziehungswissenschaft" der Kommission Bildung für nachhaltige Entwicklung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Erziehungswissenschaft (DGfE) )

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Drescher, Martina: S’il vous plaît pardon patriarche. Pragmatème ou marqueur de discours?Hide

Dieses Buch widmet sich sowohl den Herausforderungen als auch den Chancen, die sich in sprachlichen und kulturellen Kontaktsituationen ergeben. Der Band versammelt eine große Vielfalt an Beiträgen, die eben diese Phänomene unter den unterschiedlichsten Gesichtspunkten in diversen Sprachgebieten der Romania beleuchten.
Nicht nur werden darin Brücken in die Vergangenheit geschlagen, die dabei helfen, heutige sprachinterne sowie sprachexterne Phänomene zu verstehen. Es werden ferner phonetische, lexikalische, morphosyntaktische, pragmatische und soziolinguistische Spezifika sowohl der frankokanadischen Varietäten in Kanada und den USA als auch verschiedener Kreolsprachen näher betrachtet.

Martina Drescher (2019): S’il vous plaît pardon patriarche. Pragmatème ou marqueur de discours ? Quelques emplois de pardon dans les français africains. In: Szlezák, Edith / Szlezák, Klara Stephanie (Hg.): Sprach- und Kulturkontaktphänomene in der Romania / Phénomènes de contact linguistique et culturel dans la Romania. Festschrift für Ingrid Neumann-Holzschuh zum 65. Geburtstag. Berlin: E. Schmidt Verlag.

In: Szlezák, Edith / Szlezák, Klara Stephanie (Hg.): Sprach- und Kulturkontaktphänomene in der Romania / Phénomènes de contact linguistique et culturel dans la Romania. Festschrift für Ingrid Neumann-Holzschuh zum 65. Geburtstag. Berlin: E. Schmidt Verlag, 297-326.

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Essien, Etido ; Samimi, Cyrus: "Detection of Urban Development in Uyo (Nigeria) Using Remote Sensing."Hide

Uyo is one of the fastest-growing cities in Nigeria. In recent years, there has been a widespread change in land use, yet to date, there is no thorough mapping of vegetation change across the area. This study focuses on land use change, urban development, and the driving forces behind natural vegetation loss in Uyo. Based on time series Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM)/Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+)/Operational Land Imager (OLI) image data, the relationships between urban land development and its influencing factors from 1985 to 2018 were analyzed using remote sensing (RS) and time series data. The results show eight land use cover classes. Three of these (forest, swamp vegetation, and mixed vegetation) are related to natural vegetation, and three (sparse built-up, dense built-up, and borrow pit) are direct consequences of urban infrastructure development changes to the landscape. Swamp vegetation, mixed vegetation, and forest are the most affected land use classes. Thus, the rapid growth of infrastructure and industrial centers and the rural and urban mobility of labor have resulted in an increased growth of built-up land. Additionally, the growth pattern of built-up land in Uyo corresponds with socioeconomic interviews conducted in the area. Land use changes in Uyo could be attributed to changes in economic structure, urbanization through infrastructure development, and population growth. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) analysis shows a trend of decreasing vegetation in Uyo, which suggests that changes in economic structure represent a key driver of vegetation loss. Furthermore, the implementation of scientific and national policies by government agencies directed at reducing the effects of urbanization growth should be strengthened, in order to calm the disagreement between urban developers and environmental managers and promote sustainable land use.

Essien, E., Cyrus, S., 2019. Detection of Urban Development in Uyo (Nigeria) Using Remote Sensing. Land 8, 102. https://doi.org/10.3390/land8060102

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Grillo, Laura S.; Van Klinken, Adriaan; Ndzovu, Hassan J.: "Religions in Contemporary AfricaHide

Religions in Contemporary Africa is an accessible and comprehensive introduction to the three main religious traditions on the African continent, African indigenous religions, Christianity and Islam. The book provides a historical overview of these important traditions and focuses on the roles they play in African societies today. It includes social, cultural and political case studies from across the continent on the following topical issues:


  • Witchcraft and modernity
  • Power and politics
  • Conflict and peace
  • Media and popular culture
  • Development
  • Human rights
  • Illness and health
  • Gender and sexuality
Grillo, L.S., Ndzovu, H.J., Van Klinken, A.S., 2019. Religions in contemporary Africa: an introduction. Routledge, New York, NY.

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Ouma, Stefan; Hughes, Alex; Murphy, James; Opondo, Maggie: "Envisioning African futures: Perspectives from economic ..."Hide

The commentaries and reviews in the section that follow take up the recently popularized notion of 'African futures' in order to explore the geographies, modes, potentialities, politics, and practices of epistemic, socio-economic, political and socio-ecological transformations that may be complementary or antagonistic to the global capitalist project.

Stefan Ouma, Alex Hughes, James T. Murphy, Maggie Opondo: Envisioning African futures : Perspectives from economic geography. In: Geoforum, (2019). doi:10.1016/j.geoforum.2019.05.030

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Ouma, Stefan; Kweka, Opportuna: “Changing beyond Recognition”?: Reimagining the future of smallholder farming systems Hide

Stefan Ouma, Opportuna Kweka: “Changing beyond Recognition”?: Reimagining the future of smallholder farming systems in the context of climate change

We use the case of Northern Tanzania to put empirical flesh on the idea of diverse economies. We advance the idea that smallholder production systems offer ontological and practical resources to envision and perform more viable African rural futures, potentially with important lessons for the rest of the world.

Stefan Ouma, Opportuna Kweka: “Changing beyond Recognition”? : Reimagining the future of smallholder farming systems in the context of climate change. In: Geoforum, (2019). doi:10.1016/j.geoforum.2019.05.029

Ouma, Stefan: "Africapitalism : A Critical Genealogy and Assessment"Hide

Abstract of the book:

Using theory, empirical research, and case studies, this book explores the changing nature of business in Africa and how businesses can actively contribute to the development of Africa. It uses (and critically analyses) the concept of Africapitalism – a management philosophy and movement which seeks to blend the best of African values and Western management theories as a basis for sustainable development in Africa – to understand the subtle factors that underpin business decisions in Africa.

The collection of chapters in this book are organized around actors, issues, and reflections. They collectively present an account of Africapitalism, albeit from different perspectives and on different issues, and open up a new space for rethinking business and society relations in Africa from an Africapitalism perspective. Crucial is the critical engagement with both the discourse and practice of Africapitalism and its implications for sustainable development. It is anticipated that the challenges and opportunities highlighted by the book would be embraced by researchers, policy makers, and practitioners in the broad area of business and society in Africa.

This multidisciplinary book will be valuable reading for advanced students, researchers and policymakers looking at business in society; corporate social responsibility; sustainable business; international business and African development.


Stefan Ouma: Africapitalism : A Critical Genealogy and Assessment. In: Kenneth Amaeshi, Uwafiokun Idemudia, Adun Okupe (Hrsg.): Africapitalism : Sustainable Business and Sustainable Development in Africa. - London : Taylor & Francis, 2019. - S. 144-157.


Schramm, Katharina; Krause, Kristine; Valley, Greer: "Voice, Noise and Silence: Resonances of Political Subjectivities“Hide

Katharina Schramm, Kristine Krause and Greer Valley (2019): Voice, Noise and Silence: Resonances of Political Subjectivities“. Critical African Studies 10 (3): 245-256.

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Katharina Schramm; Nadine Siegert (eds.): "Handle with Care: Post_Colonial Object Matters"Hide

The zine "Handle with Care: Post_Colonial Object Matters" is the product of cross-cutting conversations. Designed as an open invitation to think further about post_colonial object_matters, it conjoins contributions from participants of a workshop on “un_doing post_colonial knowledges: perspectives from academia_arts_activism” which was held at the University of Bayreuth/Germany in July 2019, that was organised by Manuela Bauche (FU Berlin), Katharina Schramm (Univ. of Bayreuth) and Nadine Siegert (iwalewabooks).

Building on current discussions about the colonial legacies and the decolonial responsibilities of ethnographic museums, we wanted to explore the possible futures of objects marked by colonial relations of power and knowledge(s). We sought to shift the grounds of the debate from institutional concerns and legal aspects of restitution to more daring and wider-reaching questions. Our idea was to spark a debate around postcolonial justice that would decentralize the institutions of the European museum and university.

So we asked: What are the possibilities that can open up after an act of restitution to establish future-oriented relationships between different people, institutions and objects? How can we work with these “loaded” objects and generate a future with and for them? How can we create new platforms of welcoming these objects back on the African continent? How can we bring critical approaches from art, academic research, activism and museum practices in a fruitful dialogue with each other that works towards a responsible engagement with the colonial history and its material and immaterial traces?

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Stadelmann, David; Jetter, Michael; Laudage, Sabine: The intimate link between income levels and life expectancyHide

Unsere Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Einkommen pro Kopf allein mehr als 64 Prozent der Variation in Lebenserwartung erklärt, ein deutlich größerer Effekt als ihn bisherige Studien finden. Für quasi die gesamte Welt und seit 1800 zeigt sich, dass wirtschaftliches Wachstum eine höchst bedeutende Rolle für erhöhte Lebenserwartung spielt. Natürlich haben auch Innovationen in der Medizin die Lebensdauer von Bevölkerungen erhöht, aber in reicheren Ländern besteht eine höhere Wahrscheinlichkeit, diese Innovationen zuerst zu nutzen, weil sie diese bezahlen können. Die geringere Lebenserwartung in ärmeren Ländern scheint vor allem durch Armut der betreffenden Länder erklärt werden zu können. Insofern ist Wirtschaftswachstum ein Instrument für alle Bevölkerungsschichten, um die Lebensdauer und damit mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit auch die Lebensqualität der Bevölkerung zu erhöhen.

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Vierke, Clarissa: "Frau Betelpeffer und die lustvollen Stunden"Hide

2019. Vierke, Clarissa. Frau Betelpfeffer und die lustvollen Stunden. Die Inszenierung sinnlicher Erfahrung, Erinnerung und Erwartung in früher Swahili-Dichtung. In Lena Henningsen, Kai Wiegandt and Caspar Battegay (eds.): Gegessen? Essen und Erinnerung in den Literaturen der Welt. Berlin: Neofelis: 125-148.

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2019 - I


Clemens, Iris: Comment : Cultural Identities in Multilocal Spaces : bringing in multiplicityHide

The comment emphasizes upon the trinity of identity, space and connections or relations, referring to the contributions of the special issue. This perspective is used to ask for a concept of culture capturing the relationality of the social. Following the relational approach, any social actor has many identities while moving permanently between many social figurations, as e.g. network theory (White 2008) as a theory of the betweeness points out. Accordingly, a conceptualization of multiplicity of identities is a necessary component of theoretical approaches that catch up with these insights in a general emphasis on multiplicity (e.g. of space). What becomes visible is, that to grasp the multiplicity, fluidity and dynamics as well as the interdependency of identities and spaces (multilocal or else), their relationality must be focused upon. This challenges older disparities like local-global as well. In that sense, relationality is the key to bring identities, spaces and cultures together and integrate them into one concept that is capable of describing and analysing such different experiences represented in this volume.

Clemens, Iris: Comment: Cultural Identities in Multilocal Spaces : bringing in multiplicity. In: Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: Studies of Migration, Integration, Equity, and Cultural Survival Bd. 13 (2019) Heft 1. - S. 68-72.

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Diop, Boubacar Boris; Tchokothe, Rémi Armand:"L’Histoire est un éternel recommencement et presque toujours pour le pire"Hide

An interview with Boubacar Boris Diop by Rémin Armand Tchokothe in the particular circumstances of a tour on the Holocaust Museum in Nurembererg. The author of Murambi reminds of the Jewish genocide's memory compared to the genocide in Rwanda. The conversation then evokes the writer's stay at the University of Bayreuth: an opportunity to pay tribute to African studies in Germany and to speak in favour of reinforcing studies in African languages in Africa.

Tchokothe, R.A., 2018. « L’Histoire est un éternel recommencement, et presque toujours pour le pire » : entretien avec Boubacar Boris Diop. Études littéraires africaines 107. https://doi.org/10.7202/1062270ar

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Fendler, Ute: "Afrikanisches Kino: Un-gebunden undkosmopolitisch. Die «relationalen» Filme von Abderrahmane Sissako"Hide

Die Idee einer Weltgesellschaft wird – dies die zentrale These dieses Bandes – in den audiovisuellen Medien aufgegriffen und ausgeformt, indem Welt- und Gesellschaftsmodelle entworfen werden. Das Medium Film wird auf diese Weise im globalen Netz von Bewegungs- und Entwicklungsströmen einer Zweiten Moderne zu einem kosmopolitischen Akteur.

       Fendler, U., 2019. Afrikanisches Kino: Un-gebunden undkosmopolitisch. Die «relationalen» Filme von Abderrahmane Sissako, in: Christen, M., Rothemund, K. (Eds.), Cosmoplitan Cinema. Schüren Verlag, pp. 155–172. https://doi.org/10.5771/9783741001116-155

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Fendler, Ute: "Französischsprachige Literaturen : Littérature-monde oder Weltliteraturen"Hide

Die Begriffe Gegenwartsliteratur und Weltliteratur werden derzeit kontrovers diskutiert. Ihr spannungsvolles Verhältnis zueinander wurde jedoch bisher kaum beachtet. Die Beiträge des Bandes beziehen beide Begriffe u.a. vor dem Hintergrund aktueller literaturtheoretischer und -historiographischer Debatten aufeinander und erhellen sie wechselseitig durch eine Fokussierung auf das Gegenwärtige der Weltliteratur sowie das Weltliterarische der Gegenwartsliteratur. Die versammelten Beiträge aus Afrikanistik, Anglistik, Germanistik, Japanologie, Romanistik, Slavistik, Kultur- und Medienwissenschaft eröffnen interdisziplinäre wie forschungspolitische Perspektiven und werden durch Einblicke in den Literaturbetrieb ergänzt.

In: Radaelli, Giulia ; Thurn, Nike (ed.): Gegenwartsliteratur - Weltliteratur : historische und theoretische Perspektiven. - Bielefeld : transcript , 2019 . - pp. 61-86 . - (Lettre )
ISBN 978-3-8376-3365-8

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Fendler, Ute: "O Cinema Moçambicano - um cinema fantástico?"Hide

“O Cinema Moçambicano - um cinema fantástico?” In: Secco, Carmen Lucia Tindó/Leite, Ana Mafalda/Patraquim, Luis Carlos (eds.): CineGrafias Moçambicanas: Memórias e Crônicas & Ensaios. São Paulo: Editora Kapulana, 2019, 215-224.

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Matzke, Christine: “Art of Wagnis: Christoph Schlingensief’s Crossing of Wagner and Africa"Hide

Matzke, Christine, “Art of Wagnis: Christoph Schlingensief’s Crossing of Wagner and Africa, eds. Fabian Lehmann, Nadine Siegert, Ulf Vierke, Vienna, Verlag für Moderne Kunst (VfmK) [2017]”, Studies in Theatre and Performance 39:3 (2019), 308-310.

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Matzke, Christine: “J.C. Abbey, Ghana’s Puppeteer, directed and produced by Steven Feld and the Anyaa Arts Kollektif ...Hide

Matzke, Christine: “J.C. Abbey, Ghana’s Puppeteer, directed and produced by Steven Feld and the Anyaa Arts Kollektif (2016). DVD”

To date, scholars have tended, with a few exceptions, to write about African dance in primarily ethnographic terms. This collection seeks to challenge this pattern and expand dance research by engaging with the aesthetics and socio-political impact of dance for communities in and out of Africa in an increasingly global context. Contributors to this issue look at the impact that specifically situated indigenous dance forms have had on the development of new forms locally, and the reciprocal impact of local and international infrastructures, including funding bodies, tourism and festivals. African Theatre 17 examines how dance is contributing to a particularly African interculturalism, while analysing the issues of representation of Africa in a postcolonial context. Articles address the efficacy of dance to engage audiences with disavowed issues regarding gender, sexuality and dis/ability both within and beyond Africa. Highlights include a dance photo essay on F.O.D. Gang's 2017 site-specific street performance "Untitled" in Lagos, a new non-themed section, and the playscript Lunatic! by Zimbabwean playwright Thoko Zulu.

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Fendler, Ute: "Cinema Africano, um Cinema Transnacional? O cinema decolonial de Flora Gomes"Hide

“Cinema Africano, um Cinema Transnacional? O cinema decolonial de Flora Gomes.” In: Ana Mafalda Leite/Hilary Owen/Ellen W. Sapega/Sarmen Lúcia Tindó Secco (eds.): Nação e narrativa pós-colonial - III. Literature & Cinema. Lisboa: Edições Colibri, 2019, 35-48.

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Matzke, Christine: “Jesse Weaver Shipley, Trickster Theatre: The Poetics of Freedom in Urban Africa"Hide

“Jesse Weaver Shipley, Trickster Theatre: The Poetics of Freedom in Urban Africa. (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2015); David Afriyie Donkor, Spiders of the Market: Ghanaian Trickster Performance in a Web of Neoliberalism (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2016)”, Theatre Research International 43.1 (March 2018), 118-121.

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Matzke, Christine: "The Routledge Companion to Theatre and Politics"Hide

The Eritrean capital of Asmara – UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2017 – contains a stunningly beautiful collection of largely modernist buildings from the period of Italian colonial rule (1889–1941), including today’s Cinema Asmara, Eritrea’s de facto national theatre, situated at the crest of Godena Harnet (Liberty Avenue), the capital’s principle boulevard.

Matzke, Christine, “Flânerie of the Mind: Beyene Haile’s Asmara Play as a Dramaturgy of the Street”, in: The Routledge Companion to Theatre and Politics, eds. Peter Eckersall, and Helena Grehan (London, New York: Routledge, 2019), 268-271.

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Ndi Shang, Gilbert: "Writing the Wall, Righting the World. Exploring the Dionysian Dimensions of Wall Graffiti from the Agora.Hide

Ndi Shang, Gilbert: "Writing the Wall, Righting the World. Exploring the Dionysian Dimensions of Wall Graffiti from the Agora to Facebook"

The turn of the current century has witnessed the re-negotiation of materiality and the growing ascendancy of the virtual, the immaterial over the real or tangible. Though it would be presumptuous to claim that the virtual has totally assumed control over the real, it can be asserted that the figure of the wall as a transfusion between the real/virtual and the self/other has emerged between the two. Based on constructions of textuality articulated by theorists such as Roland Barthes and Friedrich Nietzsche, and a pastiche format that mimics the functionality of the wall of scription, this article brings together multiple enactments of mural scriptions that include the concrete, textual, textile, vegetative and the virtual in order to articulate the Dionysian property of wall-effects. It traces successive actualisations of the wall, analysing how the virtual Facebook wall assimilates and re-dynamizes the traits of the tangible walls through an array of intertextual/inter-medial modalities.

Faculty of Social Sciences, Universidad de los Andes, Ndi Shang, G., 2018. Writing the Wall, Righting the World. Exploring the Dionysian Dimensions of Wall Graffiti from the Agora to Facebook. MJCST 4, 113–142.

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Neubert, Dieter: "Decentralised conflicts, heterarchy and the limits of conflict regulation"Hide

he volume is meant as a tribute to Georg Klute and his work. It focusses on four thematic fields which have been central for Georg Klute’s research: “politics and beside and beyond the state”, “legal pluralism”, “anthropology of violence and war”, “anthropology of work”, and “participant observation”. The book intends to trigger debate, discussion, and thus, further evolvement of Georg Klute’s scholarly œuvre.

Dieter Neubert 2019: Decentralised conflicts, heterarchy and the limits of conflict regulation. In: Thomas Hüsken, Alexander Solyga, Dida Badi (ed.), The multiplicity of orders and practices. A tribute to Georg Klute. Köln: Koeppe, 237-252.

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Neubert, Dieter: "Middle-Income Groups in Kenya.Conflicting Realities Between Upward Mobility and Uncertainty"Hide

For more than a decade scholars mostly from economy and development studies have described the rise of a newly emerging ‘middle class’ in the Global South in-cluding Africa. This has led to a ‘middle class narrative’ with the ‘middle class’ as the backbone of economic and democratic development. Especially with regard to the stability of the position of the people in the ‘middle’, empirical social science studies challenge the ‘middle class narrative’ and at their uncertainty and insecurity. This tension between upward mobility at the one hand uncertainty and instability at the other hand (the vulnerability-security nexus) and the options to cope with this challenge under the condition of limited provision of formal social security is the focus of this case study on Kenya. Instead of an analysis of inequality based on income, it is more helpful to start from the welfare mix and the role of social net-works as main elements of provision of social security. Against this background, we identify different strategies of coping that go together with different sets of values and lifestyles, conceptualised as milieus, that are not determined by the socio-economic situation.

Dieter Neubert: 2019 Middle-income groups in Kenya. Conflicting realities between upward mobility and uncertainty. In: Sozialpolitik.ch / Social Policy. 1/2019 – article 1.3.

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Stefan Ouma, Julian Stenmanns, Julia Verne: African Economies : Simply Connect? Problematizing the Discourse ...Hide

Stefan Ouma, Julian Stenmanns, Julia Verne: African Economies : Simply Connect? Problematizing the Discourse on Connectivity in Logistics and Communication. In: Mark Graham (Hrsg.): Digital Economies at Global Margins.

In this chapter, we situate the contemporary discourse of connectivity in its historical context, excavating the “living links” (Farmer 2004, 309) that connect the policy past to the policy present. We then engage with the similarities and differences between colonial and early postcolonial discourses of connectivity, as well as the contemporary one, by considering the fields of logistics and communication as two examples that are emblematic of current development efforts under the connectivity paradigm. While acknowledging the progressive and cosmopolitan potential of connectivity, we argue that contemporary discourses of connectivity in the realm of communication and logistics are problematic for their uncritical continuation of the modernist gaze, which manifests itself in an uncritical embracement of “technoliberal boosterism” (Carmody 2012, 12). Against this background, we therefore wish to propose an alternative reading of contemporary connectivity and its underlying materialities, socialities, and spatialities by bringing to the fore three key arguments that signal the problematic nature of connectivity as a blueprint for transforming economies “at the margins”.

Stefan Ouma, Julian Stenmanns, Julia Verne: African Economies : Simply Connect? Problematizing the Discourse on Connectivity in Logistics and Communication. In: Mark Graham (Hrsg.): Digital Economies at Global Margins. - London : MIT Press, 2019. - S. 341-

Spies, Eva: Article: Being in Relation: A Critical Appraisal of Religious Diversity and Mission Encounter in MadagascarHide

This article presents a relational perspective on religious diversity and encounter. It argues that a relational perspective helps overcome notions of religious diversity that tend to be reductionist and rather static because they conceptualize diversity as the many subforms of a single instance or the parts of a whole. Accordingly, the article questions such notions and instead proposes to study the multiple relations in and through which religious actors and settings are constituted. The example of current mission work of a Nigerian Pentecostal church in Madagascar shows how religious actors and communities can be understood as products of continuous relational processes. Mission encounters are no longer viewed as encounters between discrete entities but as specific meshwork. To rethink diversity and mission encounters in relational terms not only takes up ideas of relational being in Madagascar but may also give new impulses to debates on religious exchange in plural contexts

Eva Spies. 2019. „Being in Relation: A Critical Appraisal of Religious Diversity and Mission Encounter in Madagascar“. Journal of Africana Religions 7 (1): 62-83.

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Tchokothe, Rémi Armand: "How Can Literary Works Help Us to Understand the Politics of Migration?"Hide

The island of Mayotte forms part of the Comoros archipelago in the Indian Ocean. While Mayotte is part of France and the EU, other islands of the archipelago like Grande Comore and Anjouan are not. In this video, REMI TCHOKOTHE analyzes the tensions that this situation has caused, focusing on how they have been expressed in literary works. Employing close readings of writings by Nassur Attoumani and Soeuf Elbadawi alongside critical geography and field observation, Tchokothe notes that, for these authors, historically established patterns of internal movement between the islands cannot constitute illegal migration. Noting how both authors employ the French language as a tool of resistance, Tchokothe highlights the vital, ongoing role that literature can play in the process of decolonization.

Latest Thinking, Tchokothe, R.A., 2017. How Can Literary Works Help Us to Understand the Politics of Migration? LT. https://doi.org/10.21036/LTPUB10756

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